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Full text of "Annual report of the Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society"

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OFFICERS 1911-1912 



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S. W. LEVY 

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JUDGE MAX C. SLOSS 

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ABRAHAM HAAS 

ISAIAS W. HELLMAN 

MEYER H. LEVY 

436 O'Farrell Street Telephone Franklin 546 

trustee* 

MAX J. BRANDENSTEIN S. W. LEVY 

ALFRED I. ESBERG JUDA NEWMAN 

ALEXANDER GOLDSTEIN SIGMUND SCHWABACHER 

JACOB GREENEBAUM LUCIUS L. SOLOMONS 

D. J. GUGGENHIME JACOB STERN 

MOSES HELLER SAMUEL I. WORMSER 

SIG. GREENEBAUM B. SHEIDEMAN 

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MR. AND MRS. HENRY MAUSER 

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MR. AND MRS. GUSTAVE SCHNEE 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1911-1912 



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ABRAHAM HAAS, Chairman. 
ALFRED I. ESBERG JUDA NEWMAN 

JACOB GREENEBAUM JACOB STERN 

S. W. LEVY SAMUEL I. WORMSER 

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JACOB STERN, Chairman 
MAX J. BRANDENSTEIN MOSES HELLER 

ABRAHAM HAAS SIG. SCHWABACHER 

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JUDA NEWMAN, Chairman 
MAX J. BRANDENSTEIN DAVID J. GUGGENHIME 

ALFRED I. ESBERG MOSES HELLER 

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ALFRED I. ESBERG, Chairman 
MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND MRS. MAX C. SDOSS 
LUCIUS L. SOLOMONS SAMUEL I. WORMSER 

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S. W. LEVY, Chairman 
ALEXANDER GOLDSTEIN ISAIAS W. HELLMAN 

JACOB GREENEBAUM LUCIUS L. SOLOMONS 

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LUCIUS L. SOLOMONS, Chairman. 
MOSES HELLER MRS. SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 

MRS. ADOLPHE ROOS 

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JACOB GREENEBAUM, Chairman 
S. W. LEVY «*. LUCIUS L. SOLOMONS 

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SAMUEL I. WORMSER, Chairman 
MRS. MENDEL ESBERG JUDA NEWMAN 

DAVID J. GUGGENHIME MRS. DAVID N. WALTER 

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MAX J. BRANDENSTEIN, Chairman 
ALEXANDER GOLDSTEIN MRS. WILLIAM HAAS 

MRS. LOUISA GREENEWALD JACOB STERN 



LADIES' AUXILIARY 



MRS. A. L. LENGFELD 

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MRS. DAVID N. WALTER. 
MRS. LOUISE WORMSER. 

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MRS. LOUIS SLOSS. 

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MRS. ABRAHAM HAAS. 

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MRS. S. LIEBENTHAL 
MRS. ISAAC N. WALTER. 

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MRS. ABRAHAM BROWN MRS. LOUIS MEYERSTEIN 

MRS. MATHILDA ESBERG MRS. ADOLPHE ROOS 

MRS. JOSEPH EHRMAN MRS. DANIEL ROTH 

MRS. SIDNEY M. EHRMAN MRS. LUDWIG SCHWABACHER 

MRS. WILLIAM FRANK MRS. LOUIS SCHWABACHER 

MRS. LOUISA GREENEWALD MRS. LOUIS SLOSS 

MRS. ABRAHAM HAAS MRS. MAX C. SLOSS 

MRS. CHARLES KEILUS MRS. JACOB STERN 

MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND MRS. DAVID N. WALTER 

MRS. A. L. LENGFELD MRS. ISAAC N. WALTER 

MRS. S. LILIENTHAL MRS. LOUISE WORMSER 

MRS. A. LIEBENTHAL MRS. H. K. ZEIMER 

Sjtettflranj UJanagrra 

MRS. W. HIRSCHFELD MRS. SIMON BACHMAN 



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DR. HENRY GIBBONS 350 Post St 

Telephone Douglas 2222 

DR. ALBERT ABRAMS 246 Powell St 

Telephone Douglas 1419 
DR. J. R. DAVIDSON 2119 Buchanan St. 

Telephone West 1203 
DR. E. N. TORELLO 4263 Mission St 

Telephone Market 2040 

DR. MORTON R. GIBBONS 350 Post St 

Telephone Douglas 2222 
DR. WM. C. VOORSANGER Hastings Building 

Telephone Douglas 2160 
DR. HENRY HARRIS 177 Post St 

Telephone Douglas 954 

DR. HAROLD BRUNN Butler Building, Stockton and Geary 

Telephone Douglas 2893 
DR. D. FRIEDLANDER 146 Grant Ave. 

Telephone Douglas 2752 

GDruttste uxtb Awrfeta 

DR. A. BARKAN 135 Stockton St. 

Telephone Douglas 1926 
DR. MORTON E. HART 246 Powell St , 

Telephone Douglas 2582 

EntfiHis 

DR. W. A. ATWOOD 323 Geary St. 

Telephone Douglas 4300 

DR. CHARLES G. BUSH 146 Grant Ave. 

Telephone Douglas 2912 

DR. M. R. GAMBITZ 323 Geary St. 

Telephone Kearny 127 

DR. LOUIS CONSTINE 1350 Ellis St. 

Telephone Fillmore 899 
DR. OSCAR TOBRINER Butler Bldg. 

Telephone Douglas 2807 

3C*gal Aimtear 

LUCIUS L. SOLOMONS 

atearijerjs nnh Aagfetante at tlft Asglmn 

MR. AARON L. SAPIRO Assistant Superintendent 

MISS M. G. SMYTH Kindergarten Teacher 

MISS EMMA L. NOONAN Evening School Teacher 

MISS ESSIE TOBRINER Sabbath School Teacher 

PROF. R. BARTH Gymnastic Teacher 

PROF. PHILIP H. SAPIRO Band Instructor 

MR. GEORGE GREEN. Drum Corps Teacher 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Annual Meeting of the Members 

OF THE 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum 
and Home Society 

HELD THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1911 

AT 8 O'CLOCK P. M., AT OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, 

436 O'FARRELL STREET 



The meeting was called to order by President M. C. 
Sloss, a quorum of the members being present. 

The reading of the minutes of the previous annual 
meeting was, on motion, dispensed with. 

President Sloss then submitted his annual report, 
which was followed by annual reports from Messrs. 
Abraham Haas, chairman of the Board of Governors ; 
Meyer H. Levy, Secretary; I. W. Hellman, Treasurer; 
Jacob Stern, chairman of the Finance Committee ; Henry 
Mauser, Superintendent of the Orphanage, and Gustave 
Schnee, Superintendent of the Home. 

On motion of Mr. M. J. Brandenstein, seconded by 
Mr. S. W. Levy and carried, the reports were accepted, 
ordered spread in full upon the minutes, and that a 
suitable number of copies be ordered printed for distri- 
bution among the members and the general public. 

President Sloss announced that, in conformity with 
the Constitution and By-Laws of this Society, he had 
appointed Messrs. Henry Meyer, Fred Baruch, Louis 
Greenebaum, Ludwig Schwabacher and Simon Ans- 
pacher as members of a Nominating Committee to 



8 

nominate five Trustees for this Society, whose term of 
office expires on December 1, 1911 ; that the Nomniating 
Committee has placed in nomination Messrs. Max J. 
Brandenstein, Jacob Stern, S. I. Wormser, Alexander 
Goldstein and Sigmund Schwabacher, and declared the 
polls for balloting open. 

There being no opposition to the Trustees placed 
in nomination, it was ordered, on motion duly made 
and carried, that the rules regarding balloting be dis- 
pensed with. 

The President thereupon appointed Messrs. Chas. 
Edelman and D. Michael as tellers, and the Secretary 
was authorized to cast the ballot for Messrs. Max J. 
Brandenstein, Jacob Stern, S. I. Wormser, Alexander 
Goldstein and Sigmund Schwabacher, and this being 
complied with, they were duly declared elected Trustees 
of this Society to serve for the ensuing term of three 
years, ending November 30, 1914. 

On motion of Mr. Edelman, seconded by Dr. M. 
Meyer and carried, it was 

Resolved, That all the acts, deeds and proceedings 
of the Board of Trustees for the year just passed are 
hereby ratified, approved and confirmed. 

The following amendments to the Constitution and 
By-Laws were then introduced by the Secretary, viz.: 
Amendment No. 1 : 

Section 1 of Article 8 of the Constitution amended 
by changing the word September to February so as to 
make the sentence read: "A meeting of the Society 
shall be held annually in the month of February," etc. 
Amendment No. 2: 

Section 1 of Article 9 of the Constitution amended 
by changing the word November to March, so as to 
make the sentence read: "The Society shall be governed 



by a Board of fifteen (15) Trustees, who shall at the 
first meeting of such Board held in March elect/' etc. 
Amendment No. 3 : 

Section 2 of Article 9 of the Constitution amended 
by changing the word September to February. 
Amendment No. 4: 

Section 8 of Article 9 of the Constitution amended 
by changing the word December to April. 
Amendment No. 5 : 

Section 6 of Article 1 of the By-Laws amended by 
changing the word November to March. 
Amendment No. 6 : 

Section 7 of Article 1 of the By-Laws eliminated. 
Amendment No. 7: 

Section 1 of Article 2 of the By-Laws amended by 
changing the word November to March. 
Amendment No. 8 : 

Add a new section, numbered 7, to Article 7 of the 
Constitution, to read: "The fiscal year of this Society 
shall commence on the 1st day of January and end on 
the 31st day of December of each year." 

The following amendments were also offered by 
Mr. A. Sapiro, viz. : 

Amend Article 7, Section 3, to read: 

"Sec. 3. At each annual meeting of the Society, 
there shall be elected five Trustees, to serve for the 
term of three years. No Trustee shall hold office for 
more than two consecutive full terms, but shall be eli- 
gible for re-election upon the lapse of one fiscal year 
from the end of his last term of office. All Trustees 
in office on September 1, 1911, shall be subject to this 
amendment and shall be considered as then serving their 
first term of office." 

Amend Article 7, Section 6, to read: 



10 

"Sec. 6. The Board of Trustees shall have the 
privilege of electing Honorary Trustees from those who 
have served as Trustees of this Society for not less than 
six consecutive years." 

Amend Article 9, Section 2, to read: 

"Sec. 2. At least sixty days prior to the annual 
meeting in September, the President shall appoint a 
Nominating Committee of five members, not more than 
two of whom shall be members of the Board of 
Trustees, who shall present the names of candidates 
for Trustees to serve for the ensuing term, and shall 
report the same at least four weeks before election, and 
their report shall be posted at the Orphan Asylum, at 
the Home, and at the office of the Society. The com- 
mittee must present the names of at least two candidates 
for each vacancy." 

Amend Section 3 to read: 

"Sec. 3. At such annual meeting three Inspectors 
of Election shall be appointed by the President or Board 
of Trustees, whose duty it shall be to conduct all elec- 
tions, to receive the votes of all members qualified to 
vote, and to count and canvass the same. After the 
completion of the canvass, they shall sign and file with 
the Secretary a certificate setting forth: 1st, the names 
of all the candidates with the votes of each; 2d, the 
total number of votes cast, and, 3d, the names of the 
candidates, to such number as corresponds with the 
number of vacancies, receiving the highest total of 
votes, and such candidates shall be declared elected. 
And the Secretary shall, within one week thereafter, 
deliver to each of the successful candidates a certificate 
of his election, under said Secretary's hand and sealed 
with the seal of the Society." 

Amend Section 4 to read: 

"Sec. 4. The polls of such election shall remain 



11 



open for two hours and all elections for Trustees shall 
be held by ballot. Printed ballots, containing the names 
of all the candidates, arranged in alphabetical order, 
shall be provided and the choice of members voting 
shall be indicated by marking a cross (X) opposite the 
names of the candidates voted for." 

Amend Section 5 to read: 

"Sec. 5. All votes cast for persons not duly nomi- 
nated or posted shall be counted as blank votes. All 
ballots which contain a total of votes less than the 
number of vacancies to be filled at the election shall be 
counted as blank." 

On motion of Reverend Martin A. Meyer, duly 
seconded and carried, the President was authorized to 
appoint a committee of fifteen for the revision of the 
Constitution and By-Laws, and that three members of 
said committee shall be selected from the Board of 
Trustees of this Society. 

The President thereupon appointed as members of 
said committee: Messrs. Rev. Martin A. Meyer, chair- 
man ; Juda Newman, Alexander Goldstein, Lucius L. 
Solomons, Sam Dinkelspiel, Lesser Prager, Harris 
Weinstock, Sanford Goldstein, M. H. Wascerwitz, 
Charles Edelman, Mrs. A. Lengfeld, Mrs. S. M. Ehr- 
man, Mrs. Wm. Frank, Mrs. Al. Liebenthal, Mrs. A. 
Haas. 

On motion of Reverend Meyer, duly seconded and 
carried, it was 

Resolved, That a committee be appointed to draft a 
set of appropriate resolutions to the memory of Dr. 
Henry Gibbons, Jr., for his kind and gratuitous medical 
services rendered the children of the Orphanage for a 
period of over thirty-four years. 

The President appointed Rev. Meyer a committee 



12 



of one, who thereupon presented the following reso- 
lutions, viz. : 

In the death of Dr. Henry Gibbons, Jr., the com- 
munity of San Francisco and the medical profession 
have suffered a grievous loss. But even more do his 
friends feel keenly the demise of a man of such ster- 
ling character and unselfish activity. 

For many years the wards of the P. H. O. A. were 
under the gratuitous care of Dr. Gibbons. More cheer- 
ful service was never rendered. Always ready and 
eager to serve and to heal, he endeared himself to the 
individuals under his charge as well as to the officers 
and administrators of the institution. His generosity 
is not forgotten; his name stands among our generous 
benefactors, for he gave himself. 

In our ancient literature it is written that "the 
righteous of people shall enjoy a share of the life eter- 
nal/' Henry Gibbons will live in peace in the realm 
of the everlasting, and his memory be treasured and 
honored by the friends of humanity. 

God bless his name, and send comfort of sympa- 
thetic love to those who, nearest and dearest to him, 
most deeply mourn his loss. 

The memory of the righteous is a blessing. On 
behalf of the P. H. O. A. & H. S., with love and 
affection. 

M. C. SLOSS, 

President. 
MEYER H. LEVY, 

Secretary. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

MEYER H. LEVY, 

Secretary, 



ffatafflntf a fttpatt 



To the Honorary President, Officers and Members of 
the Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : In accordance with the 
established custom, I beg to present to you my report 
of the condition and progress of the Society during the 
past year. In so doing, I shall deal with the direction 
and management of the Orphanage and the Home in 
a general way merely, as the reports of the Superin- 
tendent of the Orphanage and of the Superintendent 
and Matron of the Home will give full and detailed 
information, together with all needed statistics, concern- 
ing the activities of the two institutions and the welfare 
of their inmates. 

The financial operations of the Society during the 
past year are shown by the report of the Secretary. I 
desire, however, to call your attention to certain features 
of this report which by comparison with the correspond- 
ing items of the preceding year are at once interesting 
and gratifying. In the report which I made a year ago, 
I felt impelled to make some comment with regard to 
the expenditures of the Society, which for the year 
1909-10 reached the high figure of $75,324.17. It was 
pointed out that this heavy expense was due, in large 
part, to the fact that the Board of Trustees had been 
compelled during the year to expend considerable sums 
in repair and improvement of grounds, buildings and 
equipment. These expenditures being for permanent 
betterments, a considerable diminution of outlay for the 
succeeding year was to be hoped for. I am glad to be 



14 



able to say that this expectation has been realized. The 
total expenditures of the Society for all purposes during 
the year last past has been $61,964.17, or $13,360 less 
than during 1909-10. The actual cost of maintaining 
the Asylum and the Home without regard to payments 
for improvements and the like has been substantially 
the same as last year, a reduction in the expense of 
maintaining the Home being slightly more than counter- 
balanced by an increase for the Asylum. This increase 
is, however, in part at least, to be accounted for by 
necessary changes in the dietary, of which I shall have 
a few words to say later. 

The Secretary's financial statement is further inter- 
esting in its demonstration of the great advantage which 
this Society has derived from the formation of the 
Federation of Jewish Charities. Some difficulty in 
drawing conclusions arises from the fact that our fiscal 
year, ending August 31st, does not coincide with that 
of the Federation, which makes its collections and allot- 
ments on the basis of the calendar year, i. e., January 
1st to December 31st. Accordingly, the amount shown 
in the report as received from the Federation on account 
of apportionment for 1911 ($38,109.97) in reality in- 
cludes an apportionment made in 1910 after August 
31st, the close of our fiscal year, and for the same 
reason excludes such further apportionment as will be 
made by the Federation during the current calendar 
year 1911. These two items are about equal, and the 
amount shown as received from the Federation is 
approximately equal to the annual allowance which this 
Society, on the present basis of collections and dis- 
bursements by the Federation, would have a right to 
expect. I suggest, however, the advisability of chang- 
ing our fiscal year to correspond with that of the Fed- 
eration, in order to simplify the keeping of the accounts 



15 

and the making of necessary calculations. 

It will be seen that the allotment from the Federa- 
tion, added to our regular sources of income, such as 
interest, rent and State aid, brings our total receipts, 
exclusive of donations and bequests, up to $55,346.98, a 
sum which is very nearly the cost of the maintenance 
of the Asylum and the Home. We are thus enabled 
to apply the sums received by way of donation to the 
payment of expenses outside of regular maintenance 
such as improvements to buildings, grounds or plant, 
and in addition to show a surplus of some $4,000, 
which, as recommended in my last report, should be 
retained, if possible, as part of a real estate and building 
fund to meet the expense of acquiring a new location 
and structures for the Orphanage. 

In this connection I may say that the Board has 
felt more strongly than ever that the time is near at 
hand when the present grounds and buildings on De- 
visadero Street should be abandoned and the Orphanage 
moved to a site more favorable to the proper care and 
development of the children. The advantages of having 
an educational institution of this character in a more 
isolated location are obvious. Besides, the building is 
old and does not comply with modern standards for 
structures designed to house large numbers of children. 
A committee appointed by me during the year under 
the chairmanship of the Vice-President has been actively 
engaged in seeking a proper site in the country for our 
Orphanage. A number of tracts have been offered and 
examined and several of these are now under consid- 
eration. It is hoped that the committee will soon be able 
to present to the Board a site which will fulfil all of 
the requirements and conditions of area, nearness to 
educational facilities, wholesomeness of climate, together 
with good soil and an adequate supply of pure water. 



16 



When this is accomplished, the further steps for the 
planning of the necessary buildings and providing for 
their construction will be promptly undertaken. 

Early in the year, Mrs. M. E. Jaffa, who, in addi- 
tion to her training as a physician, has established a 
high reputation as an expert in dietetics, was good 
enough to give to the Orphanage the benefit of her 
advice with respect to the diet of the children. She 
made a careful study of the conditions affecting the 
feeding of our children, spending a number of weeks 
at the work, and made an exhaustive report covering 
the entire field, and presenting her recommendations. 
In accordance with this report, a change in the dietary 
was ordered and this change has been in effect for a 
number of months. The effect upon the well-being of 
the children as evidenced by comparative weights and 
measurements has been extraordinary. The work is, 
however, not yet completed. Further changes are to 
be made and until conditions have been brought to the 
point to which with the assistance of Mrs. Jaffa we are 
striving, it would not be well to undertake to give the 
particulars of any changes which have been made or 
any partial statistics of the results. The changes made 
have necessitated an increase in the consumption of 
some articles, notably milk. There is, however, no 
doubt in my mind that the members of the Society will 
approve the policy of making any expenditure within 
reason that may serve to bring our wards up to the 
physical standard of the average child in a well-ordered 
home. 

It has long been felt that a great saving could be 
effected by securing a supply of water on our own 
grounds. Accordingly, we engaged an expert well borer 
to drill for water on the grounds of the Orphanage, but 



17 

our hopes were disappointed, as after sinking to a con- 
siderable depth no water was obtained. 

The conduct of the Orphanage with respect to the 
education of the children has undergone no great 
change, the principal item of interest in this connection 
being the establishment of a course in Domestic Science 
for the girls, with the intent of fitting them to perform 
in a competent manner the ordinary duties of the 
household. 

There have been some changes in the staff of the 
Asylum, Mr. Sapiro having resigned his position as 
assistant superintendent in order to take up again his 
legal work, which he had temporarily interrupted at 
the request of the Board, and being succeeded by Mr. 
L. J. Gordon. Mrs. Green, who had been acting as 
assistant matron for a considerable time, resigned, and 
was succeeded by Mrs. L. M. Sendey, who, in turn, 
resigned after several months, and was succeeded by 
Miss Jennie Samuels. Miss Samuels has recently sev- 
ered her connection with the institution and her place 
has not yet been filled. The general management of 
the Asylum has remained in the hands of Mr. Mauser, 
and that of the Home in those of Mr. and Mrs. Schnee. 
Of their work I need only repeat what I said in my last 
report. 

In addition to the bequests and donations in money 
which are shown in the Secretary's report, we are under 
obligations to generous friends for other benefactions. 
The Asylum received from Messrs. Sherman, Clay & 
Co. an upright piano of high grade. Mrs. Bella 
Schwabacher, who in the preceding year, as noted in 
the last report, presented the Asylum with a fine library, 
supplemented her gift with that of ten book cases, which 
were needed to accommodate some of the books. An 
emergency dispensary and bathroom and two sick rooms 



18 



have been completely equipped according to the most 
approved sanitary requirements by a lady who has 
shown a very warm interest in the Orphanage. I regret 
that her own desire that no public recognition of her 
generosity be made prevents me from expressing in a 
personal way the deep sense of obligation which we 
must feel. The same benefactress has provided a fine 
playground equipment for both the boys' and the girls' 
side of the yard. 

The synagogue at the Home was adorned and im- 
proved by the installation of leather-upholstered pews, 
the gift of Mrs. Jacob Stern, and stained glass windows, 
the gift of Mrs. B. Schweitzer. 

In conclusion, I have to express my grateful appre- 
ciation to the Board of Trustees and the various officers 
of the Society for their earnest and untiring work, which 
has enabled the Society to complete another year of 
prosperous activity. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAX C. SLOSS, 

President. 

San Francisco, September 28, 1911. 



Itepnrt flf Iff* QHfatrman 



To the President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : In accordance with custom, 
I herewith present to you a report of such matters as 
come more particularly under my jurisdiction as chair- 
man of the Board of Governors for the year just past. 

Applications for admission into the Orphanage of 
thirty-five children were received, all being from San 
Francisco, and of these, twenty were acted upon favor- 
ably and fifteen rejected. 

At the Home, nine applications for admission were 
received, of which seven were admitted and two are still 
in the hands of committees to report upon. 

Each of these applications has been carefully inves- 
tigated, and great care exercised by the committees 
appointed for that purpose as to the worthiness of the 
applicant, and if some have been rejected, sufficient 
cause and reason have been found therefor. 

Our worthy President has already given you a full 
account of the more important happenings that have 
transpired in the history of our Society, so it is there- 
fore useless for me to again reiterate what we have 
accomplished or dwell upon our shortcomings and the 
difficulties we have had to contend with, so the few 
remaining remarks that I have to make will pertain 
more particularly to the Home, which, as Vice-President 
of your organization, comes under my more immediate 
charge. 



20 



The happy and contented appearance of our inmates 
and the splendid condition of the house and grounds are 
ample evidence that your Board has not been neglectful 
of those whom you have intrusted to their care. Our 
Superintendent and Matron, Mr. and Mrs. Gustave 
Schnee, have been indefatigable in their efforts towards 
making the institution over which they preside a home 
in the true sense of the word, and by their kindness, 
gentleness and a supreme desire to assist them in every 
way, they have brought to the aged inmates in the 
declining years of their lives sunshine, contentment and 
happiness. 

We have grown in our work, and both of our insti- 
tutions have advanced and expanded. Our Home is 
now filled to its utmost capacity, and as our population 
grows more dense, so also will the number of those who 
need our benefactions increase. The time is rapidly 
approaching when much-needed additions and enlarge- 
ment of the capacity of the Home will have to be under- 
taken, so there is no reason why our vigilance should 
slacken or our energies in forwarding the interest of 
our Society lessen. 

I therefore sincerely hope and trust that all of our 
friends will continue to give us their active co-operation 
so that our noble Society will progress as favorably in 
the future as it has in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ABRAHAM HAAS, 

Vice-President. 



&wr*tanj*a firpnrt 



To the President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : In compliance with the laws of this 
Society, I beg herewith to respectfully submit my annual report 
for the fiscal year ending August 31, 1911 : 

INCOME. 

BEQUESTS— 

J. Friedman $ 2,666.67 

Solomon Kahn, Oakland 1,000.00 

A. Hammerslag 637.82 

Bertha Marks 500.00 

Fabian Toplitz 500.00 

Charles Kohn 500.00 

Bartlett Doe 405.00 

Rosine Koshland 250.00 

Daniel Levy 50.00 



$ 6,509.49 



DONATIONS IN MEMORY— 

From Isaac Harris, in memory of 

of wife $ 150.00 

From Herman Eppinger, in memory 

of wife 7.50 



DONATIONS— 

James L. Flood $ 1,000.00 

Mrs. and Mr. Sig Schwabacher, in 
celebration of marriage and 
birththday anniversary 1,000.00 

Mrs. J. J. Mack, commemorating 
birth of grandchild, John Mack 
Roos 250.00 

Joseph Marks 100.00 



$ 157.50 



22 



Miss Edith Hecht, in honor of 

brother Joel's marriage 100.00 

Charles G. Lathrop 25.00 

Mrs. Stella G. Simon 25.00 

Mrs. S. Ickelheimer 25.00 

Anonymous 7.50 

M. G. Levy 5.00 

Anonymous (Sacramento) 5.00 

Joseph B. Goldstein. 4.00 

DONATIONS TO HOME— 

Bequest of Sol. Lewis $ 500.00 

Mrs. Johanna Getz 25.00 

Samuel Aftergut, for perpetual light 

in synagogue 12.00 



$ 2,546.50 



$ 537.00 



HOME BUILDING ACCOUNT— 

Donation from the Ladies' Auxiliary 
of the P. H. O. A. toward plumb- 
ing work at the Home $ 1,000.00 

MEMBERSHIP DUES . 2,006.00 

FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES— 

Account apportionment for 1911.... $38,109.97 

INTEREST ACCOUNT— 

Interest on Bonds and Savings Bank 

Deposits $ 5,556.98 

Less, Interest on Treasurer's 

overdraft $ 31.72 

Written off on Bonds 406.25 

Interest due to Special Funds, 
viz. : 

Anspacher Musical Fund 360.00 

Premium Fund 327.34 

Leopold Cahn Fund 120.00 

Herman Behrendt Fund 200.00 

$ 1,445.31 $ 4,111.67 



23 



HOME ENDOWMENT- 



From Estate of Natalie Muller $ 250.00 

From Herman Levin 30.00 

$ 280.00 

REAL ESTATE— 

Rent of property, Silver Ave. and 

Mission St $ 464.00 

ORPHANS' RELATIONS— 

Toward support of children $ 670.00 

RETURNED EXPENSES— 

Asylum $ 819.46 

Home 478.62 

Ladies' Auxiliary 16.43 

$ 1,314.51 

STATE AID— 

For six months ending Dec. 31, 1910.$ 4,321.42 

For six months ending June 30, 1911. 4,069.41 

$ 8,390.83 

Total, $66,097.47 



EXPENDITURES. 

ASYLUM MAINTENANCE $42,911.78 

ASYLUM TAXES 1,460.00 

ASYLUM INSURANCE 486.51 

LADIES* AUXILIARY— 

Account clothing for children 972.96 

Total cost maintenance of Asylum $45,831.25 

HOME MAINTENANCE $ 9,873.89 

HOME TAXES 406.20 

HOME INSURANCE 50.00 

Total cost maintenance of Home $10,330.09 



24 

ASYLUM IMPROVEMENTS 3,690.88 

HOME IMPROVEMENTS , 1,976.45 

HOME ENDOWMENTS— 

Lodge dues and assessments on $2,000 insurance 10.50 
HOME REAL ESTATE— 

Flinn & Tracy, account sewer on Lisbon St 125.00 

Total, $61,964.17 

INCOME $66,097.47 

EXPENDITURES 61,964.17 

Gain $ 4,133.30 



SPECIAL FUNDS. 
RECEIPTS. 
PREMIUM FUND— 

Return of sundry prizes awarded $ 15.00 

BAND UNIFORM FUND— 

From Pavers and Rammers' Union $67.30 

From Precita Parlor N. S. G. W 46.00 

$ 113.30 

TECHNICAL TRAINING FUND— 

Instalments paid account sale of P. H. O. A. 

Printery $ 745.00 

ANSPACHER MUSICAL FUND— 

Tuition and expenses of brass band $ 360.00 

HERMAN BEHRENDT FUND— 

Prize awarded Ezra Shapeero $200.00 

Prize awarded Arthur Lando 200.00 

$ 400.00 

TECHNICAL TRAINING FUND— 

Sundry expenses $ 1,491.35 



25 



PREMIUM FUND— 



Prize awarded Annie Goldberg $100.00 

Prize awarded Ida Wolfe 100.00 

Emanuel Steigman, Irene Batavia, An- 
nie Blumenthal and Abe Friedman, 

$10.00 each 40.00 

Sam Fingerhut, Max Rosansky, May 

Fingerhut, Esther Schwartzberg, 

Clarence Levy, Florence Rosenthal, 

Charles Silvey, Helen Wile, Isidor 

Price, G u s s i e Rosenberg, Rose 

Miller, Edna Wile, Rita Fabian, 

Meyer Kahn, Isidore Jacobs, Mollie 

Forman, Annie Shefsky, Irene 

Lando, Charles Silvey, Charles 

Marks, Isidor Price, Gertrude 

Schubert, Harry Offenbach, Fannie 

Eisner, May Fingerhut, Irene Wile, 

Ira Offenbach, Roy Smith, Mitchel 

Steigman and Celia Eisner, $5.00 

each 150.00 

Medals and sundries 184.33 

$ 574.33 



ASSETS AND LIABILITIES. 
ASSETS. 

Cash, September 1, 1911 $21,285.48 

REAL ESTATE, Russ St 1,200.00 

STATE AID RECEIVABLE 4,069.41 

SAVINGS BANK DEPOSITS— 

Security Savings Bank $1,956.76 

Mutual Savings Bank 1,382.16 

German Savings Bank 2,522.31 

Union Trust Co 5,533.37 

San Francisco Savings Union 2,387.05 

Hibernia Savings Bank 2,520.71 

French Savings Bank 1,341.24 

$17,643.60 



26 



BONDS ACCOUNT— 



$10,000 Market St. R. R., 6% $10,000.00 

5,000 Omnibus Cable, 6% 5,297.50 

19,000 Sp. Valley Water Co., 4%... 16,500.00 

10,000 Sutter St. R. R., 5% 10,060.00 

5,000 Northern R. R. of Cal., 5%.. 5,360.00 

10,000 Pacific Electric R. R., 5%.... 10,100.00 

5,000 Los Angeles Electric, 5%... 4,975.00 

15,000 Atch., Topeka & Sta. Fe, 4% 14,700.00 

5,000 Ore. R. R. & Navig. Co., 4% 4,918.99 

5,000 Union Pacific R. R., 4% . . . . 5,000.00 

5,000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R., 4% 4,900.00 

5,000 Richelieu Investment Co., 5% 5,000.00 



3,811.49 



ASYLUM EXPENSE, ADVANCED 150.00 

HOME EXPENSE, ADVANCED 100.00 

Total, $141,259.98 

LIABILITIES. 

GENERAL FUND— 

August 31, 1910 $75,251.57 

Gain for fiscal year 1910-1911 4,133.30 

$79,384.87 

SINKING FUND 21,150.00 

HERMAN BEHRENDT FUND 5,206.60 

LIBRARY FUND .41 

LEOPOLD CAHN FUND 3,283.59 

PREMIUM FUND 8,510.90 

BAND UNIFORM FUND 139.30 

PLEASURE FUND 35.56 

ANSPACHER MUSICAL FUND 9,000.00 

TECHNICAL TRAINING FUND 1,639.45 

BAND INSTRUMENT FUND 709.30 



$ 1,850.00 



27 



ORPHANS' TRUST FUND— 

Rosa Schiffer $ 350.00 

Frederica and Esther Wolf 150.00 

Meyer and Samuel Kuhn 100.00 

Newton and Harry Hart 750.00 

Clarence Levy 325.00 

Harold Levy 175.00 

MEMORIAL FUNDS— 

Louis Strauss $10,000.00 

Rev. Max Lilienthal 250.00 

Hilda A. Son 100.00 

$10,350.00 

Total, $141,259.98 

THE ROLL OF MEMBERSHIP STANDS AS FOLLOWS: 

Honorary Members 6 

Life Patrons 15 

Life Members 200 

Patrons 68 

Subscribers 277 

Members 1,726 

Total 2,293 

Respectfully submitted, 

MEYER H. LEVY, 

Secretary. 
San Francisco, September 28, 1911. 









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To the President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : Your Committee on 
Finance respectfully beg leave to report that they have 
examined the books and accounts of the Secretary from 
month to month, examined the assets in the hands of 
the Treasurer, verified the vouchers of all the approved 
bills, and find same correct, as also the Secretary's 
annual report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M.J. BRANDENSTEIN, 

Acting Chairman. 

September 28, 1911. 



5tea0ttr*r'a SUpnrt 



To the President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Ladies and Gentlemen: I beg herewith to submit a report 
of the receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year ending 
August 31, 1911 : 



RECEIPTS. 

1910 September 1, balance on hand $ 6,097.73 

" September $ 1,339.00 

" October 19,614.96 

" November 1,950.73 

" December 7,905.23 

1911 January 3,074.48 

" February 1,073.66 

" March 1,351.68 

" April 13,290.70 

" May 6,157.87 

" June 9,721.68 

" July 4,018.47 

" August 10,536.85 

$80,035.31 

Total $86,133.04 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

1910 September $ 6,221.20 

" October 4,790.11 

" November 5,897.83 

" December 6,376.25 

1911 January 4,371.89 

" February 3,203.43 

" March 5,028.42 

" April 6,470.06 

" May 4,754.09 



32 

" June 6,158.82 

" July 5,208.40 

" August 6,367.06 

: $64,847.56 

Balance on hand August 31, 1911 21,285.48 

Total $86,133.04 

Respectfully submitted, 

ISAIAS W. HELLMAN, 

Treasurer. 

September 28, 1911. 



i- 1 




JRejmrt iif tip B\xytxwXtvfotx\X 
nf tip ©rpljanagf 



To the President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Ladies and Gentlemen: I herewith submit my 
report for the past fiscal year. 

On August 31, 1910, we had 166 children, 83 girls, 
83 boys; since then 26 were discharged, 21 were admit- 
ted, leaving on August 31, 1911, 161 children, 78 girls 
and 83 boys. 

The number of inmates per month was as follows: 
September, 165; October, 160; November, 155; Decem- 
ber, 154; January, 154; February, 154; March, 158; 
April, 152; May, 151; June, 154; July, 154; August, 161. 

The average per month was 156. The total number 
of children cared for during the year was 187. 

According to age, the children range as follows: 

AGES. 





Girls. 










Boys. 






4 yrs. 


4; 11 


yrs. 


3 


4 


yrs. 


l; ii 


yrs. 


4 


5 " 


4; 12 




8 


5 




3; 12 


u 


8 


6 " 


5; 13 




7 


6 




3; 13 


tt 


7 


7 " 


4; 14 




8 


7 




7; 14 


a 


8 


8 " 


8; 15 




4 


8 




7; 15 


u 


7 


9 " 


6; 16 




1 


9 




7; 16 


a 


4 


10 " 


11; 17 




3 


10 




17; 17 


a 







18 




2 






18 


u 






34 



The average for boys was 10.68 years; for girls, 
10.47 years, and the average age of all was 10.58 years. 
Our wards were received from the following 
localities : 

San Francisco, Cal 140 

Los Angeles, Cal 22 

Oakland, Cal .. 9 

Sacramento, Cal 4 

Elmhurst, Cal 2 

Sonora, Cal 2 

Santa Cruz, Cal 2 

Pioche, Nev 2 

Seattle, Wash 2 

Tacoma, Wash. ... * 2 

187 



HOUSE AND GROUNDS. 

Our building is still unsatisfactory for its purpose 
in spite of the many improvements that have been made 
during the past two years. A casual glance would con- 
vince any intelligent observer that the three-story and 
basement wooden structure would be a death trap in 
case of fire. We have had occasion to think very seri- 
ously from this point of view, as since my last annual 
report there have been four small fires, which, had they 
not been discovered in time by extreme good fortune, 
would have ended in the probable destruction of the 
entire building. It should cause some immediate and 
deep thinking to realize that this old and drafty build- 
ing would be an easy prey to the smallest start of fire. 
There are too many lives involved to warrant our silence 
on this subject. The building is dangerous, out of 
accord with modern needs, with constantly increasing 
expenditures for repairs, and, in the opinion of many, 



35 



it is representative of the kind of institution that we 
have outgrown. We recommend with all the earnest- 
ness in us that steps be taken to secure both a different 
system and safer and more sanitary quarters for our 
children. 

Nevertheless, we have done a great deal to make 
the house safe and livable. In order to lessen the 
terrors of disaster, we have held many fire drills during 
the year under as many varied conditions and at as 
many varied times as we possibly could; and we have 
re-arranged the younger children's bedrooms so that 
enough older children sleep next to the little ones to 
take care of them in case of necessity. 

We have also attempted to beautify the rooms, and 
to encourage the children in their efforts to do so. We 
have added curtains and pictures in our dining room, 
have introduced white tablecloths and napkins and have 
done all that is possible to make these bleak and bar- 
ren rooms assume an aspect of cheerful homeliness. 
Through the beneficence of the one person whose gen- 
erous heart seems to be closest to the needs of our 
children, we have been given a beautifully equipped rest 
room for the use of the older girls. The reception hall, 
the library, the boys' club room and the girls' club room 
also satisfy the aesthetic requirements as well as their 
more obvious purposes. We want every room in the 
house to reflect cheer, because the immediate atmos- 
phere of the child has much to do with the absence or 
presence of happiness within him. 

But perhaps the finest addition to our building has 
been the renovating and refurnishing of accommoda- 
tions for our sick. We are forbidden to express our 
gratitude for this gift, but nothing can prevent us from 
feeling the deepest appreciation of the womanly insight 



36 



and motherly generosity which prompted such thought- 
fulness. Both the boys' and girls' sick rooms have the 
walls and floors painted and have been provided with 
new and completely equipped beds, shades, curtains, 
tables and various ornaments for beautifying. On the 
boys' side have been built a thoroughly outfitted bath- 
room and an emergency surgery with all implements 
necessary for such a use. 

The grounds, too, have been beautified by the crea- 
tion of grass lawns and flower beds to replace the 
unsightly scene that greeted you at the last meeting. 
They are now cared for by the assistance of the boys, 
and the present fine condition is good evidence of what 
a surrounding of beauty means to them. 

The condition and equipment of the house as they 
now stand are satisfactory with the exception of the 
very obvious need of new beds and bedding. This 
matter has been brought up repeatedly and it has been 
repeatedly shown that our beds are in poor condition 
and are not the kind that children should be forced to 
use. When we realize that they are mere frames with 
slabs of iron to hold up the mattress, we wonder how 
all other orphanages around this locality are able to 
provide their children with modern spring beds while 
we alone retain these prison cots. We need new beds 
and we need new pillows and new bedding in general. 
If these are procured, and they can be reasonably pro- 
cured, we feel that conditions within the building would 
be as good as they can be while we are compelled to 
remain in our present quarters. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMIES. 

Several domestic economies introduced during the 
year call for comment. We no longer purchase our 
meat in small quantities on daily order. We have built 



37 

a cooling meat room as an annex to our store-room and 
are thus enabled to purchase our meat in bulk and use 
it as we need it. The scheme has proved economical 
and profitable in that it gives us better meat at even 
less cost. We have also introduced a new and larger 
mangling machine and body ironer in our laundry, thus 
enabling us to handle a much greater amount of work, 
and to enable the children to have more towels, hand- 
kerchiefs and napkins than the previous equipment per- 
mitted, and also saving the labor of one person, with 
apparently better results in work. 

We have finally dispensed with our shoe-repairing 
department. The result has given us much finer work 
and some small saving in the actual cost. Moreover, 
we are spared the constant need of supervision of work 
that does not directly lie within the sphere of an 
orphanage and we have the certainty that the children 
are receiving as fine care as good materials and expert 
workmanship can afiford. 

We have had to face serious difficulties in the 
matter of servants and employees throughout the house. 
We could not secure help of the character we considered 
proper for contact with our children, except at pro- 
hibitive wages. It was therefore necessary for us to 
put the matter squarely before the Board, with the 
result that we were empowered to employ Japanese to 
fill the vacancies. We have solved the difficulties and 
at the present time of writing, use Japanese only for the 
very heavy and disagreeable work about the house. 
Wages and labor considered, we can now boast of a 
very efficient and satisfactory group of helpers in each 

department. 

HEALTH. 

The year has given us great concern in the matter 
of health. We believe that we have taken every pos- 



38 



sible precaution to make our children strong and healthy 
and to care for them if they should perchance meet 
with mishap or disease. Our sick rooms are ideal for 
all purposes and our physicians could not be more 
attentive than they have been. The children were very 
carefully inspected during the year by Doctors Morton 
Hart and Henry Harris, who noted all abnormal condi- 
tions on the cards provided for their records. Doctor 
Oscar Tobriner inspected the teeth of all the children 
and made similar reports as to the condition in his 
department. And, in accordance with the suggestions 
of these specialists, we have had treatment by the vari- 
ous members of our staff of physicians. So that we 
feel that every precaution of human foresight has been 
taken to secure the best living conditions for our wards. 
We have had, however, epidemics of mumps and measles 
during the year, and five cases of ringworm on the 
scalp, three of which still persist, although under marked 
improvement. 

The list of cases was: 
20 cases measles. 
24 cases mumps. 

9 cases adenoids (operated). 

7 cases enlarged tonsils (operated). 

2 cases strabismus (operated). 

1 case pneumonia. 

1 case broken arm. 

1 case broken nose. 

1 case abscess of jaw. 

1 case dislocation of jaw. 

1 case double mastoid (operated). 

We must acknowledge the deepest appreciation for 
the services of Doctors Hart, Harris and Tobriner in 
making detailed examinations of almost two hundred 



39 



children and in suggesting lines of treatment for every 
abnormal condition. It required a great deal of time to 
do this and a tremendous amount of patience, and we 
believe that the community owes these three men a 
much larger appreciation than I can here express in 
words. 

This year we have paid more than ordinary heed 
to the care of the teeth. Much work has been done by 
our very efficient dentist, Doctor Louis Constine, and 
the benefit to the children has been very evident. We 
have learned a lesson in this regard. We have learned 
that the care of the teeth is as important as the care 
of the eyes and other special organs, and we propose 
to be watchful at all times. Our children must be in 
thorough condition and we cannot afford to ignore a 
single factor. 

DIET. 

After a complete and thorough study of this sub- 
ject, we came to the conclusion that our diet was not 
so satisfactory as we could make it. We therefore in- 
vestigated the subject deeply, gathered statistics on the 
weights and ages of the children to see if they were 
below standard, kept a record of their likes and dis- 
likes, and at the proper time requested the expert assist- 
ance of Mrs. Professor Jaffa, who very generously 
responded to our call. Mrs. Jaffa lived in our home for 
a week and at the end of that time was enabled to help 
us frame a diet with some definite understanding of our 
particular limitations. We now believe that we have as 
good and satisfactory a diet as any institution in the 
country. We have on file a copy of the diet which is 
now actually in use in our home, and without hesitation 
declare that it will serve a model for all child-caring 
organizations. We have but one further step to take in 



40 



this regard. We want to eliminate all waste in food 
and we expect during the near future to make a com- 
plete study of the question of waste in the dining rooms 
and kitchen in order to limit ourselves to the proper 
amounts of food and to control extravagance in cooking 
and serving. 

EDUCATION. 

During this year we have made tremendous strides 
in helping the children to develop themselves physically. 
We have secured the services of Professor Miehling to 
instruct the children every Sunday morning in class 
gymnastics and at his suggestion we have obtained a 
great deal of new equipment for the gymnasium — 
traveling rings, stall bars, balance bar, low parallel bars, 
punching bag, Indian clubs, wands, etc. For the greater 
part of these, we are indebted to Mrs. Sidney Ehrman, 
and we believe that no better investment could have 
been made for the particular benefit of the children. 
We have also seen the installation of what has been 
our chief desire for many years — a completely equipped 
outdoor playground. We owe this again to the same 
generous soul who furnished our sick rooms and rest 
room, and we trust that she feels amply recompensed 
for her kindness in the joy that our children and the 
children of the neighborhood have been granted through 
her kindness. Not another institution in this section 
can show the advantages for physical training that you 
can see around you, and the improved condition and 
growth of our children bear ample testimony to the 
value of such superiority. 

We have made many advances in other forms of 
development and education. We have equipped a large 
room for manual training. Eight boys are now taking 
the work under our personal direction. Each has his 



41 

own work bench and tools and with four and a half 
hours a week for actual work can turn out a great many 
articles for the use of the house in general. There are 
several samples of their skill to be seen in the work 
room and about the house, and we heartily commend 
the results of the few months that we have thus far 
been able to spend in this way. 

We began our classes in Domestic Science some 
months ago under the charge of a teacher who came 
twice a week and instructed twelve girls in a limited 
amount of cooking. But there was nothing else done 
in the department and the instruction in this line was 
too meager to be practical. We have therefore recently 
changed the entire system to the following effect: All 
the older girls are taught cooking, washing, dressmak- 
ing, sewing and general housework in the periods after 
school each day under the care of Miss H. Mamlock. 
In this way we hope that they will cover the entire field 
of girls' work, including a bit of millinery, for which 
we have not yet been enabled to make definite plans. 
The girls receive additional help in this regard from 
Mrs. Martin A. Meyer, who instructs them twice 
monthly how to set tables, serve food and, in general, 
to conduct themselves properly in the dining room. 

Our younger girls also receive instruction in sewing 
three times a week. These classes are held in the open 
air, in preference to the school rooms. This method is 
giving good results as the children are not compelled to 
submit to the same discipline necessary in a class room. 

We have encouraged the use of our splendid library 
to the fullest extent. We now have over 1,960 volumes 
of children's literature, with books to satisfy every pos- 
sible age and temperament. The children are permitted 
to borrow books, according to their grade in school, at 
least once a week, and the average weekly circulation 



42 



is now 68 books. We have a complete card catalogue 
of the names and authors of every book and keep an 
exact record of the time for withdrawal of each volume. 
The children come to the library on the evenings as- 
signed to their particular division, so that every part 
of the week has been perfectly systematized and super- 
vised. The books are housed in a room that does credit 
to the collection and we take particular pride in the 
best children's library on the Coast. 

We no longer conduct our little kindergarten on the 
premises. The room has been devoted to the use of a 
girls' club room and the little children are taken each 
morning to the Golden Gate Kindergarten, where they 
receive the best personal instruction and suffer no incon- 
venience from the short walk. 

So far as school reports are concerned, we have 
nothing to add to our usual commendation except that 
the girls have now been transferred to the Denman 
School on the top of the hill and our boys have been 
divided between the Crocker and Fremont Schools. We 
now have one boy in Cincinnati at the Hebrew Union 
College, two boys at Lowell High School, three boys 
snd two girls at Commercial High and two girls at 
Girls' High School. This means that we are giving the 
opportunity of higher education to six per cent of our 
children and we intend to recommend every worthy 
child for the opportunity to go through high school 
and learn to develop his brain in addition to his brawn. 
Reports from all sources are very complimentary in 
regard to the children and their records are a source of 
pride to those who make inquiries. 

Our evening school is now in exceptionally capable 
hands. It is very rare to find an individual who can 
inject her whole personality into almost every child in 
a big home like ours and can make every child feel that 



43 



she stands for something distinct and something inspir- 
ing. Miss Emma Noonan has done this from the very 
first day of her work with us, has helped every move- 
ment among the boys and girls to its present satisfac- 
tory condition and has contributed more in personal 
service and in material ways to the development and 
encouragement of children's activities than any person 
other than Mrs. M. A. Gunst. 

Our efforts in religious matters have been greatly 
extended during the past year. We reorganized our 
Sabbath-school in every particular through the able 
services of Mr. A. L. Sapiro, Mrs. S. Caro and Mr. Leo 
Rabinowitz, and have mapped out courses of work 
which will cover the entire ground of Jewish literature 
and religion in the space of a five-year period for each 
child. This is the average length of stay and we believe 
that we can cover the ground more thoroughly and 
regularly than any Sabbath-school in the city. We have 
also paid particular attention to our synagogue services 
and have celebrated each holiday and religious festival 
appropriately. On Hannukah we had a very beautiful 
children's service; Pesach and Purim we celebrated in 
ways that the children will not soon forget, and on 
Hannukah night, through the kindness of Mrs. Spiegel, 
Mrs. Jacobi, the Ladies' Auxiliary and a club from Miss 
Meininger's class in the Emanu-El Sabbath-school, all 
the children were presented with individual gifts and 
showered with goodies of various kinds. On the major 
holy days, our beautiful little synagogue was the means 
for emphasizing the spirit and the interpretation of each 
religious occasion with splendid effect. 

We have attempted to introduce a broader spirit 
into our home and with this aim in view have encour- 
aged many lectures and concerts. We shall refer to 
these later under "Children's Activities," for they were 



44 



primarily arranged for and by the children themselves. 

We have given the greatest attention to musical 
culture. We have selected records for our graphophone 
with great care and have attempted to secure admission 
for the children to concerts and musical events. Quite 
a few of the girls receive piano lessons and our little 
choir has been a tremendous agency for inspiring a love 
and knowledge of real music. 

The band has been an object of particular pride. 
Under the tuition of Mr. Philip Sapiro, the boys have 
made such progress that musicians all over town have 
commented upon the rapid development of the new 
material. The boys are learning not merely to play, but 
to read and understand music, to develop taste and to 
form some judgment as to values of music. We feel 
greatly indebted to Mr. Sapiro for his able service and 
his exceptionl interest in our boys. Our drum corps 
unfortunately has not fared so well. We lost our leader 
and have been attempting to maintain our standard by 
our own efforts. Under the leadership of little Sanford 
de Bow, the boys have done very good work, and we 
give public commendation to little Sanford, who had 
the grit and interest to refuse to let the drum corps 
die for want of leadership. 

We now regard the Emanu-El Sisterhood as in some 
way an annex to our home. When our girls leave us, 
if they have no relatives to go to, they live at the 
Emanu-El Sisterhood on payment of sums in propor- 
tion to their income. The Sisterhood becomes their 
actual home, supplying not only the physical needs, but 
also incentives to culture and happiness. We feel that 
in some respects the concerns of the Emanu-El Sister- 
hood, so far as they relate to the care of our girls, are 
of great importance to the Orphanage; but inasmuch 
as the direct care of the girls is left to the Board of the 



45 



Emanu-El, we believe that they must consider them- 
selves wholly responsible for the happiness and well- 
being of the girls. We desire to emphasize this point 
at the present time, not to avoid responsibility, but in 
order to indicate to those interested exactly how thor- 
ough and how critical their scrutiny and attention 
must be. 

CHILDREN'S ACTIVITIES. 

We now reach what is in our humble opinion the 
most important section of our report — the activities of 
the children. We would consider OUR work a total 
failure unless we saw the reflection in counter activities 
among the boys and girls. They have done many 
things, have developed many little institutions, and 
some of them are of sufficient importance to warrant 
mention at this time. 

A. Children's courts. Our boys' and girls' courts, 
composed of a chief justice and four associates, have 
done splendid service during the year. They have 
drawn up all the rules for the house in reference to the 
children. They have determined the hours for the bells 
to ring; they selected the time for rising in the morn- 
ing; they voted on the hour of going to bed. Every 
detail of routine has been their choice. They have done 
remarkable and conscientious work in this regard. 
They have also selected all the medalists and prize win- 
ners with exceptional justice. They have heard and 
judged most of the breaches of discipline arising in 
the house, have made suggestions as to the use of the 
library, as to food, clothing, appearance of the house 
and everything else that can come within the sphere of 
children's interests. We would not be just if we failed 
to acknowledge our appreciation to these courts for 



46 



creating an entirely new and independent spirit of help- 
fulness among the children. 

B. We must also explain the work of the athletic 
councils, giving our special commendation to the boys. 
These councils select the sports which the children are 
to adopt, choose the managers and captains of the 
teams and award the sweaters and pins for meritorious 
work. They have complete charge of uniforms and 
equipment and have done admirable work in creating 
pride in home activities. The boys have uniforms for 
all their games and are backed up by a splendid rooting 
section and the full spirit of every child in the house. 
It is no wonder that they have defeated all antagonists. 
Under the leadership of our boys, the Jewish Sabbath- 
school Athletic League of San Francisco was formed 
during the past year. There have been to date one 
track meet, one basketball series, one handball tourna- 
ment and one baseball series. Two trophies were con- 
tested for during this year and both of these trophies 
are now in the possession of our boys. They also won 
a special trophy through a series of baseball games 
with the Stockton Sabbath-school. In all of these cases, 
the opposing teams have been much larger than our 
boys, but organization and pride in the Home that 
they represented have proven stronger than mere 
physical advantages. Nothing that I could suggest 
speaks more for the fine health of our children and 
their splendid house spirit than the possession of these 
three trophies. Every child in the house feels proud 
of his home, and it is most unusual for children to be 
actually and positively proud that they come from an 
orphanage. This is due wholly to the fact that they 
have made the Orphanage something to be proud of, 
and we must thank each one of them for this great 
service. 



47 

The girls have not accomplished very much in the 
line of athletics, but under the leadership of Miss Ida 
Miller, who has just completed her training in chil- 
dren's playground work, they have taken a new impetus 
and bid fair to make a record comparable to that of the 
boys. They have learned the beauty and grace of folk 
dances and gave an exhibition of these dances to the 
children on the Fourth of July. We commend highly 
this interesting and aesthetic form of play and we are 
grateful to Miss Emma Noonan and Miss Miller for 
their patience and labor with the little ones. 

LABOR COUNCILS. 

C. Our little labor councils have done their work 
well. They distribute all the work among the children, 
choose the inspectors and dismiss or retain the inspector 
according to the way in which the grounds and building 
are kept. They have distributed the chores with rea- 
sonable fairness and soundness of judgment. 

D. The club spirit has been very strong among us 
during the past year. The Girls' Auxiliary, composed 
of the older girls, has been hardly more than a name, 
but the Jane Addams Club, the younger girls, has done 
exceptionally well. They have undertaken to supply 
the dining room with vases and flowers for every 
Jewish holiday and every celebration. They have under- 
taken to passe-partout pictures and distribute them all 
over the house; they have undertaken to give affairs 
for the children three or four times a year, and, besides 
this, they have debates, readings and splendid meetings 
in which subjects of an enlightening nature are dis- 
cussed. They gave a Purim dance at which every child 
in the house was masked and costumed and at which 
every child had a particularly enjoyable time. On 
Fourth of July, celebration was managed wholly by the 



48 



Jane Addams Club, which supplied both entertainment 
and refreshments for the audience. 

The club has also introduced a series of lectures, 
given in the synagogue at intervals of about one month. 
Doctor Jessica Peixotto gave a charming explanation 
of ''Why We Love Fairies" ; Doctor Martin Meyer told 
all about the little Jewish children of other lands; Mr. 
Harris Weinstock gave a striking and effective talk 
on being square and generous. The Jane Addams Club 
made all the arrangements for these speakers and pro- 
vided in them most entertaining and inspiring evenings. 
All in all, they have undertaken to supply the elements 
of joy, beauty and self-help fulness, and they have ac- 
complished a vast step in this direction. 

The Boys' Club has but recently been reorganized. 
Their beautiful room was equipped with chairs, rugs, 
tables, pictures, plants and banners chiefly through the 
thoughtfulness and generosity of the Jane Addams 
Club. They have begun to reciprocate by doing things 
for the house and thus far have given one dance to the 
children and have projected several interesting debates 
with the Jane Addams Club and other evenings of self- 
education and enjoyment. They also intend to assume 
charge of the religious celebrations on Succoth, Han- 
nukah, Purim and Pesach. 

E. Our Boy Scout movement progressed very well 
for a long time and was the only engineering corps in 
the State. Mr. Wm. Wollner organized and drilled the 
boys, and the Pathfinder Patrol had many a good hike 
and many a joyous outing under his guidance. We 
believe that the Boy Scout movement should be en- 
couraged and we trust that our good friend will see 
his way clear to resume charge. 

F. The P. H. O. A. Savings Bank is in a very 



49 



flourishing condition. We now have 123 depositors, 
total deposits of $604.91, an average of $4.92 for each 
depositor. The bank pays interest at six per cent on 
all deposits and encourages thrift in every way. The 
bank also does a collection business. If a child owes 
money to another or to the corporation, the bank under- 
takes to collect the debt and charges a penny or so for 
its trouble. In this way the bank manages to pay the 
cashier fifty cents a month, which, incidentally, he earns 
ten times over. 

G. The Refreshment Corporation shows the most 
remarkable results of any financial institution we have 
been connected with. It has been in existence but little 
over a year. During that time it has paid over six 
hundred per cent in dividends and has now on hand the 
amount originally subscribed — $25 — a surplus of $22.50, 
stock on hand worth $6.00, linoleum, curtains and stand, 
all purchased by the corporation itself. The children 
conduct this business in a very wise manner, refusing 
to sell to extravagant and sickly children and encour- 
aging the purchase by friends and relatives of such 
things as are beneficial as well as enjoyable for the 
children. 

We close this section with the feeling that the 
children have done an almost incredible amount of work 
in organizing and maintaining these various activities. 
We single out for special commendation, in connection 
with these movements, Abe Friedman, Charles Davis, 
Charles Silvey and Saul Klein among the boys, and 
Ida Miller, Annie Blumenthal, Ethel Silvey and Fannie 
Fabian among the girls. 

INDIVIDUALISM. 

We have always maintained the necessity for bring- 
ing out the individuality of the children, to remove as 



50 



much institutionalism as is possible without destroying 
the routine inevitable in such a place. We have there- 
fore tried to make our children like the children of the 
outside world in comforts, appearance, in manners and 
in feeling. We encouraged the idea of a rest room, so 
that the older girls, when tired, could rest and take 
ease as they would in their own homes. We insist 
upon the right of each child to show and express his 
preference for particular education or particular work, 
and if his preference seems wise, we encourage him. 
We have done our best to destroy the suggestion of 
uniforms. We buy as many and as desirable patterns 
as we can for clothing and we have the garments cut 
in the most reasonable modern fashion and in every 
way try to dress the children so that one could not tell 
by meeting them that they come from anything other 
than the average home. Our greatest advances in this 
regard were the introduction of knickerbocker suits for 
the boys and summer dresses and sane underwear for 
the girls, and umbrellas and rubbers for all the chil- 
dren who required them. As a whole, we think our 
children are dressed as simply and acceptably as the 
most critical could desire. 

We have made special efforts in the dining room 
to develop the individual. We have small family tables 
and soon expect to seat the children of one family 
together and to group friends as near as we can to one 
another so as to make the company at the table as 
congenial as that of a home ought to be. We have 
introduced white tablecloths and white napkins, so that 
the children should have a table set before them in 
exactly the same manner as in other homes and so that 
they may take greater care of the appearance of things. 
For the finer a thing looks, the more they try to keep 
it looking fine. Each child now butters his own bread, 



51 

seasons his own food and does such other things for 
himself as is the custom among the children. All in all, 
we aim to develop in our children a proper regard for 
themselves and a pride in the things about them. 

There is one other feature of our dining room 
which is perhaps the most beautiful single suggestion 
we have evolved. A birthday is an individual's most 
personal day and we have attempted to respect this 
feeling by keeping one table for the use of birthday 
parties only. Whenever a child's birthday comes, he 
may invite to his party four children absolutely of his 
own choice and he sits at the special table with his 
friends and has his few little extras and feels that it is 
truly his birthday, his personal celebration. We do not 
hesitate to say that the birthday table is the sweetest 
and most heart-tugging feature of our dining hall. 

RECORDS. 

This year has seen great progress in the matter of 
office records. We have cards giving the complete 
physical condition of each child and the treatment he 
may receive at any date. We have cards showing the 
complete record of the child at school and at home and 
his physical growth. We have also made a decided 
advance in our system of keeping accounts, now having 
a complete inventory and requisition system and an 
absolutely modern method of bookkeeping. We hope 
soon to have our accounts and records in as up-to-date 
a condition as those of any similar institution in the 
country. We have only one group of cards to add to 
our collection, the records of our graduates. This has 
been a tremendous task, but we have a great deal of 
data and will secure more during the coming years and 
so perfect our office system. 



52 
EXECUTIVES. 

We are very fortunate in now having the service of 
Mr. Louis J. Gordon as assistant superintendent. He 
has proved himself thoroughly efficient and thoroughly 
equipped in every regard. He has gained the confi- 
dence and affection of the children and will prove in- 
valuable in our efforts to develop their character and 
well-being. We held ourselves very unfortunate, on 
the other hand, in losing the services of Miss Maysie 
Smythe, who for many years showed exceeding capacity 
and tact in her work among us. She has been suc- 
ceeded by Miss Mary Cowling, who is perhaps as 
capable and as well beloved a woman as ever stepped 
within our institution. We are particularly to be con- 
gratulated on her presence among us and expect her to 
develop far along the lines of her predecessor. We 
have also created the situation of governess, by which 
we mean some one who will direct the play of the 
children, take an active part in their various organiza- 
tions and activities and be the chief agent for super- 
vising the routine of the girls. One of our own gradu- 
ates, Miss Ida Miller is at the present time performing 
this work and has shown remarkable ability in handling 
the problem. She promises, under our tuition and 
guidance, to develop expert capacities for this branch, 
and we believe that her success indicates the correctness 
of our judgment in selecting a girl of our own training 
for this position of our own creation. 

Our special thanks are due to the Mount Zion 
Hospital, Lane, Children's and California Hospitals for 
their kind accommodation and care for our children. 
In this regard, we owe particular gratitude to the Mt. 
Zion Hospital, Miss Bertha Cohen, superintendent, and 



53 



Miss McKenzie, superintendent of nurses, for the excep- 
tional attention given to our little ones. We thank the 
managers of the Alcazar and Columbia Theaters and 
the Fairyland Nickelodeon for many courtesies. We 
express our sincere appreciation of the great service 
given to our wards by Doctors H. Gibbons, Jr., M. R. 
Gibbons, Rosenstirn, Harris, Brunn, Hart, Sewell, 
Barkan, Tobriner, Friedlander, Voorsanger, Davidson, 
Sherman, Hunken and Levison. 

We thank Doctor Marin A. Meyer, Mr. Harris 
Weinstock and Miss Jessica Peixotto for their helpful 
talks; Mrs. Martin Meyer, Mr. Wm. Woolner, Mrs. 
Shapro, Miss Stolz and Miss Hyman for their services 
as teachers and leaders; we thank Mr. Lachman for the 
very generous use of his grounds for our annual picnic ; 
we thank the Newbauer Dyeing and Cleaning Co. for 
their very frequent services; we owe particular thanks 
to Mr. Philip H. Sapiro and the Musicians' Union for 
supplying us with orchestras for the various dances ancl 
occasions at which the children have enjoyed music' 
We appreciate the kindness of Mr. Will Greenebaum in 
providing us with tickets for his concerts and to Mr. 
J. Cal Ewing for his courtesies during the baseball 
season in favor of our boys. We also thank the Call, 
Examiner, Post, Globe and Bulletin for their daily 
papers. And, as an organization, we owe a tremendous 
debt of gratitude to those whose interest in our home 
has been shown by personal service, by knowing our 
children and giving them the joy of kind words and 
friendship. There are several who do this, but they will 
pardon us if we single out Mr. Max Rosenberg as a 
type of this most valuable and most praiseworthy 
friend. To all of them we owe our thanks. 

The year has been full of work, but equally full of 
happiness in the knowledge that the children know and 



54 



appreciate what we have tried to do and have actually 
accomplished. We have improved the condition of the 
house, added much to the individual interests of our 
boys and girls and have advanced far in the direction 
of converting the Asylum into the Home. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY MAUSER, 

Superintendent. 



Mthxtnl SUjmrtfl of tJy^ GDrpijanag? 



Separt af Sr. ^*ttnj ijarrin 

To the President and Board of Directors of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Gentlemen : I beg leave to present the following 
general report concerning the health conditions of the 
Asylum : 

In all, it has been eminently satisfactory. In spite 
of the existence of twenty cases of measles and twenty- 
four cases of mumps, some of the latter being rather 
severe, no fatalities have occurred, nor serious after 
effects. The children previously examined, in addition 
to those admitted during the year, have been re- 
examined and supplemental notes made on their con- 
ditions. These notes now exist in the form of a card 
index. 

In general, it may be said that the findings indi- 
cated a well-nourished and well-developed group of 
children. Such defects as were found, as anemia, 
bronchitis and indigestion, were treated as indicated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY HARRIS, M. D. 

December 22, 1911. 



ft*tmrt nf Sr* Mtttttm C fart 



To £/^ President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society: 

I herewith submit a report of the special work 
done by me at your institution for the past year. 

All new children admitted to the Home during the 
year were examined and those needing treatment along 
special lines received proper attention. 

Children wearing glasses were re-examined and 
changes were made when necessary. Those developing 
any symptoms of eye-strain were properly fitted. 

A few acute diseases of the ear and throat were 
reported, but these were of minor importance. 

Adenoids and tonsils are being removed, in those 
cases requiring this operation, as rapidly as time will 
permit. 

I am pleased to state that the physical condition 
of the children as regards the special sense organs is 
practically normal. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MORTON E. HART, M. D. 

December 21, 1911. 



Ifctttiaf a Jteport 



To the Honorable Board of Trustees of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Gentlemen : I take pleasure in submitting my 
report for the past year. I also beg to compliment the 
discipline of the children while in the dental office. 

In the past year I have treated 389 cases, as per 
statistics, which follow: 

22 gold fillings. 
164 amalgam fillings. 
83 cement fillings. 
64 extractions. 
49 treatments. 
6 gold crowns. 
1 porcelain bridge. 

389 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS S. CONSTINE, D. D. S. 
August 28, 1911. 



Bmuttfotta in Sfttti to % ©rpijattag* 



1910. 

Sept. 1. Mrs. M. Koshland 4 Victor Records 

2. Newbauer's 6 Dresses and 6 Coats Cleaned 

8. Newbauer's 24 Dresses Cleaned 

12. Precita Parlor, N. S. G. W 15 gals. Ice Cream 

13. Airs. Schweitzer A box of Shoes and Clothes 

13. Mrs. M. A. Gunst 17 Victor Records 

13. San Joaquin Parlor N. S. G. W 2 boxes Peaches 

14. Roos Bros 29 Children's Hats 

14. Mrs. A. Roos 29 Children's Hats 

16. Abr. L. Brown 3 boxes Good Books for Boys 

17. Henry Goldstein 800 Gum Labels for Sarah Blum 

Library 

17. Isadore Cohen 10 tons Coal 

20. Mrs. A. Roos 7 Straw Hats 

20. Southern Pacific Co 3 Framed Pictures 

26. Mrs. J. Stearn .4 Hats and 1 Suit 

Oct. 1. Mrs. E. R. Lilienthal $50 for Ice Cream and Cake 

2. Mrs. Simon Bachman...2 boxes Oranges and 1 box 

Apples 

4. Mrs. E. Wunch A box of Assorted Jellies 

4. P. H. O. Alumni. Flowers for Synagogue or New Year 

10. Anita Stern Books, Pictures, 2 Games, 1 Swing 

14. Mrs. E. Brandenstein 1 Overcoat 

16. Mrs. M. A. Gunst. 17 Graphophone Records 

19. S. P. Co., Mr. Chas. Fee 4 Pictures 

20. Mrs. S. W. Heller 3 Hats 

22. Temple Emanu-El 1 load of Fruit and Raisins 

Nov. 3. Mr. Samuel Strauss $5.00 for Boys' Athletic Fund 

10. M. J. Brandenstein $25 for Athletic Funds 

10. R. Goldman $1.00 

15. Rabbi Louis Kopald 6 Tennis Balls 

17. E. B. Courvoisier 1 Murillo Picture 

21. Mrs. Meyerstein 20 Small Umbrellas for Babies 

21. Mrs. S. Bachman 20 Pairs of Rubbers for Babies 

21. Mrs. Joe Mayore 2 boxes of Candy for Babies 



59 

Dec. 6. Mrs. I. N. Walter 9 Books and 9 Hats 

8. Mrs. Sidney Ehrman 1 Hanuka Light 

10. Mrs. M. I. Cahn 10 Games 

10. The Emporium $10 Merchandise Order 

8. Guild 1 bag Assorted New Clothes 

12. Mrs. L. I. Cahn 24 Dressed Dolls 

12. Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Kline 1 pail Candy 

13. Mrs. M. I. Cahn 10 Stamp Books 

14. Mr. S. Frankenheimer 25c for Boys Athletic Fund 

14. Ellery Arms Co., Branch No. 2 8 Tennis Balls 

14. Mrs. L. M. Spiegel, Branch No. 2, Juvenile Section.. 

Jump Ropes, Dolls, Tops, Baseballs and Bats 

14. Weinstock-Lubin Co Assorted Hats 

14. Mrs. L. M. Spiegel 6 Manicuring Files 

15. Mrs. A. Levy 12 Hair Ribbons 

16. Mrs. Theresa Sutro $5.00 for Chanukah 

23. Mr. S. W. Levy Rubber Goods and Toys 

17. Mrs. L. M. Spiegel 5 boxes Dominoes, 2 boxes 

Checkers 

17. Mrs. I. N. Walter Assorted Fancy Gifts 

19. Mrs. S. W. Heller 2 Altar Chairs 

21. Mrs. Julius Cahn 12 Pairs Gloves 

21. Mrs. L. M. Spiegel 7 Manicuring Files 

21. Philadelphia Shoe Co Sweets 

15. Rosenberg Bros 1 case Honey 

22. Crown Flour Mills Co $5.00 for Small Children 

22. Mr. J. Gollober Hannukah Lights 

22. Mrs. H. Sinsheimer 12 Pictures, 1 doz. Cups and 

Saucers, 5 Bracelets 

22. Mrs. J. J. Gottlob A Quantity of Toys 

22. Mrs. Lewis Gerstle $10 

22. Miss Alice Prager, Secy. Four Leaf Clovers Dolls 

22. Mr. Milton Esberg, Jr Toys for Children 

23. Ernest L. Esberg Toys 

23. Miss Frances Triest Cahn Toys 

23. Miss Barbara A. Mayer Toys 

23. Gimbal Bros Candy for Children 

24. Ladies' Auxiliary 7 Victor Records 

24. Mrs. J. Roth 4 Dressed Dolls 

24. Mrs. Simon Bachman 1 box Oranges 

24. Miss Margery H. Loewe A quantity of Toys 

24. Mrs. Ludwig Schwabacher A quantity of Toys 



60 



25. Mrs. J. J. Gottlob....Toys and Ice Cream, Cakes and 
Candies for Hannukah 

26. Mrs. Bernard Schweitzer 175 packages of Candy 

26. Mr. French Conveyance of Goods to Orphanage 

26. Sidney & Esther Ehrman .Toys 

26. Alumni, P. H. O. A Gifts to Children 

26. Mrs. B. P. Goldberg Some Music 

30. Blum's Confectionery A quantity of Candy for 

New Year 

1911. 

Jan. 4. Mrs. Jacobs Music Books, Clothing 

3. Mrs. Dorothy Walter 1 Chair 

5. Mrs. M. L. Wolff 1 case Honey 

6. Messrs. Armand Cailleau. 

10. Madame A. Roos 24 Boys' Wash Suits, 26 Boys' 

Suits, 12 Pair Trousers, 70 Hats, 5 Coats 

25. Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld 1 Picture 

Feb. 1. Mr. Jos. Kahn 6 gals. Ice Cream and 25 lbs. Cake 

1. Mrs. Liebenthal Dolls Dressed for Girls 

3. Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld $7.30 

2. Mrs. Wm. S. Hockstadter 2 boxes Candy 

6. Messrs. Raphael Weil &Co. .Assorted 1911 Calendars 

8. Emanu-El Sisterhood 12 Books 

14. Fish and Game Commission 88 Ducks 

20. Miss M. G. Smyth Cash 50c 

23. Home for Aged 26 doz. Eggs 

27. Golden Pheasant Cakes for Children 

Mar. 1. Mr. M. Rosenberg Scrim for Children's Dining 

Room Curtains 

1. Mrs. M. Brandenstein Toys, Pictures and Books 

1. Mrs. J. B. Levison Magazines and Clothing 

3. The Golden Pheasant A box of Bell Decorations 

3. Mr. Meyerfeld, Jr 1 Complete Dinner 

8. Argonaut Club Magazines 

14. Mrs. S. Bachman 2 boxes Oranges 

13. Symplex System Co 150 Dance Programs 

11. Mrs: Sidney Ehrman 13 doz. Masks 

13. Mrs. Schweitzer 6 gals. Ice Cream 

14. Mr. and Mrs. Koshland Assorted Cakes 

3. Mr. and Mrs. Meyerfeld, Jr $50 for Boys' Athletic 

Fund, $20 for Girls' Athletic Fund, $17.29 for Holiday 
Fund 



61 

15. Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld 6 Table Napkins 

17. Mrs. M. L. Weil Magazines and Cards 

22. Mrs. E. B. Courvoisier 1 Picture 

27: Levy Electric Co 1 Medical Electric Battery 

29. Mr. Albert Brown. 3 Games, 1 box Paints and 16 Books 

29. From Merced A box of Assorted Clothes 

31. Mr. Max Morgen 1 large box of Candies 

Apr. 4. Mme. A. Roos 19 Boys' Wash Suits, 12 Hats 

5. Mrs. M. Brandenstein. 

8. Mrs. M. Stone 26 Books 

11. Mrs. Liebenthal. .2 Hats and some Dolls' Pieces for 
the Girls 

11. Mrs. L. Friedman 1 demijohn Raisin Wine 

12. Mrs. S. Berel 2 demijohns Raisin Wine 

12. Mrs. Bertha Goldstein 1 demijohn Raisin Wine 

12. Mrs. Cohn 1 demijohn Raisin Wine 

12. Mrs. Hannah Bernstein 3 bottles Wine and $5.00 

15. Miss M. Smyth 1 box Candy for Babies 

15. Mrs. D. Harris 1 gal. Raisin Wine 

15. Mrs. Albert 1 gal. Raisin Wine 

15. Mrs. Casson y 2 fal. Raisin Wine 

15. Mrs. Goldsmith 1 gal. Raisin Wine 

18. Mrs. Lewis Meyerstein 4 Hats and 9 Boys' Ties 

19. Mrs. Greenewald 16 Magazines 

22. Mrs. Foorman. .Children's Clothing, 8 Dresses, 1 Coat, 

6 Pairs Drawers 

24. Dr. Martin A. Meyer $2.00 

28. Mr. A. M. Rude 1 bolt Cloth 

May 2. Mrs. Moses Heller 2 Coats, 2 Hats 

2. Mrs. Liebenthal 5 Books 

2. Mrs. Bremer 17 Miscellaneous Volumes 

4. Mrs. Ray Diwal 22 Magazines 

10. Mrs. Liebes A box of fire damaged Blouses 

11. Marcuse & Co Buttons 

13. Marcuse & Co 1 doz. pairs Hose Supporters 

16. Mr. Albert J. Dollinger 4 pairs Girls' Shoes 

14. Mr. G. Welesch Parcel of Magazines 

19. Golden Pheasant 2 Cheese Cakes 

19. Mrs. S. Ehrman Apparatus for Gymnasium 

19. Ellery Arms. Co 2 additional Rings, Ropes and 

Adjusting Straps and 6 Ropes 



62 



30. Miss Florence Ostern 25 pounds Candy 

29. Miss Jeanette Arndt 1 GiiTs Coat 

June 2. Mrs. L. Hauseman 1 Tailored Suit 

2. Mrs. S. L. Bernstein.. 6 gals. Ice Cream, 25 lbs. Cake 

5. Marks Bros 18 Bracelets 

5. Edwin M. Jacobs. Books, Toys, Games, etc. 

7. E. Block Mercantile Co 3 sets Toy Dishes 

8. Mrs. J. Peters Pkg. of Miscellaneous Clothing and 

. • Shoes 

9. Golden Pheasant 4 Long Cakes 

11. Mrs. Gus Breuner 6 gals. Ice Cream, 25 lbs. Cakes 

17. Jos. Sloss, Jr., and Henry Esberg Sloss 1 Piano for 

Gymnasium, 38 Miscellaneous Books 

19. H. Levinson 23 Books 

21. Mrs. J. Cohn Clothing, Shoes and Toys 

23. Mrs. Henry Meyer Assortment of Boys' Clothing 

and Collars 

27. D. J. Guggenhime 2 cans Honey 

30. Rosenthal's 12 pairs Shoes 

July 1. Mrs. Chas. Hirsch. .1 Magic Lantern, Slides and Games 

3. Mrs. J. Cohen Miscellaneous Collection of Toys, 

, Books, etc 

7. Mrs. Meyer 25 Books for Library 

14. I. Magnin & Co 3 Wash Dresses 

12. Newbauer 43 Dresses, 25 Coats cleaned 

17. Mr. Schnee 25 lbs. Candy 

20. Mrs. E. Jellenick Miscellaneous Collection of Toys 

24. Mrs. E. A. Hyman Toys and Books 

Aug. 1. Mrs. Henry Meyer Magazines and Shirts 

4. Roos Bros 19 Assorted Hats 

16. I. Magnin & Co 23 Straw Hats 

15. Mr. Guggenhime 1 7-lb. Trout 

22. Miss B. Jacobs Assortment of Neckwear 

Aug. 26. Standard Millinery Co V2 doz. Hats 

28. I. Magnin & Co Assortment of Summer Hats 

31. Mrs. Uhlman Assortment of Children's Clothes 

31. Newbauer Cleaning Co.. Cleaning 100 pieces Dresses, 

Coats, etc. 



fttpaxt irf tip fttptrittfottottt 
nf tip ifame 



To £/*£ President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Ladies and Gentlemen: It is a pleasant duty to 
tender you a detailed accounting of the affairs at the 
Home for the Aged for the year 1910-1911. We say 
pleasant, for, thanks to the Almighty and you, ladies 
and gentlemen, the supporters of our Society, we have 
been placed in a position to care for the old people 
entrusted to us in the same manner as we would care 
for our own parents. Your charges are not only pro- 
vided with the necessities of life, but they enjoy also 
such luxuries as are provided in the best private homes, 
and in case of illness they are given the best of care 
and medical attention obtainable ; in some cases we have 
even employed special nurses for a long period of time. 
It is a special source of pleasure to us to be in a posi- 
tion to say in our annual report that, excepting one old 
lady who has been but lately admitted and who was 
brought here in a very feeble condition, the other thirty- 
five all enjoy good health and are happy. 

Our greatest concern is to keep the old people in 
good health and to avoid the ills that come from over- 
feeding or foods not properly prepared, stale or unfit 
for their aged digestive organs. This we have in a 
measure eliminated by requesting the relatives to cease 
bringing food into the Home. Still there are many who, 
instead of co-operating with us, smuggle in eatables 
absolutely unfit for old people, believing they are kind 
to their relatives or friends, while in fact they do them 



64 



the greatest injury. The Home provides four meals a 
day, and for some even five. Nothing but the best the 
markets afford is bought, while eggs are supplied from 
our own hens, and vegetables grown in our own garden. 
These foods are prepared in the cleanest and most 
thorough manner and supplied to the inmates in abun- 
dant quantities and at exactly the same hour and minute 
every day. You, ladies and gentlemen of the Board, 
know these things, for you see them constantly, but 
we mention this here in the hope that the relatives of 
our old people will stop showing their kindness by 
bringing in food to the Home without our knowledge, 
for by co-operating with us, they will save suffering 
to the old people and great worry to the management. 

The physical condition of the Home buildings and 
grounds is, thanks to the liberal policy of the chairman 
on Buildings, Mr. Juda Newman, and his committee, 
in excellent condition. The vacant land is all being 
cultivated, some in vegetables for the Home use and 
some in potatoes. 

The ladies of the Auxiliary are all doing splendid 
work, devoting their time principally in furnishing 
entertainments for the old people and generally looking 
after their comforts. 

The plumbing system, which the ladies have helped 
to install, is a great source of satisfaction and pleasure. 

At the close of the fiscal year the Home cared for 
thirty-six inmates ; during the year, seven were admitted. 
One gentleman left the Home to live with a daughter 
in Los Angeles and six were called in to their final 
resting place; the names, ages, etc., of the departed 
ones are as follows: 









TIME IN 


NAME 


AGE 


DATE OF DEATH 


HOME 


Mrs. Constance Levy 


88 years 


Sept. 10, 1910 


4^4 years 


Mr. Louis Gronosky 


74 " 


" 22, " 


4 months 


Mr. Jacob Fox 


71 " 


Nov. 28, " 


3 years 


Mr. Israel Hartman 


77 " 


Dec. 5, " 


sy 2 " 


Mr. Solomon Ochs 


86 " 


Mar. 8, 1911 


uy 2 " 


Mrs. Abigail Da Costa 


89 " 


June 9, " 


iy 2 " 



May their souls rest in peace. 



65 

Of the thirty-six inmates the Home now cares for, 
nineteen are ladies and seventeen gentlemen; their com- 
bined age is two thousand seven hundred and fifty 
(2,750) years, the average age being seventy-six and 
one- fourth (76^4) years, the youngest being sixty- 
seven (67) and the oldest over ninety-two (92) years. 
We have six inmates between the ages of sixty-seven 
(67) and seventy (70) years, eighteen inmates between 
the ages of seventy (70) and eighty (80) years, eleven 
inmates between the ages of eighty (80) and ninety 
(90) years, and one inmate over ninety-two (92) years 
old. 

Our oldest, who is now over ninety-two years, 
God bless her ! is still the youngest in manner and 
actions, and it is safe to say, and our records show, that 
those of the old people who come to the Home at ages 
between sixty-five and seventy-five, and in a fair state 
of health, are the ones who live the longest and gener- 
ally enjoy good health. The reason for it is not a 
secret. It is due to the regularity of their lives, the 
enforced cleanliness of their habits and the wholesome 
nourishment given, that this is possible. We have one 
with us who has been here for nineteen years, and it 
is safe to say he is physically the strongest, although 
he is now eighty-six years old. 

You, ladies and gentlemen, who are providing the 
means to carry on this work certainly obey the com- 
mands of God very nobly, and may He shield and pro- 
tect you and yours against want and illness in your old 
age. Amen. 

We are under many obligations to the Board of 
Governors for their ever-ready advice and assistance 
rendered us at all times during the past year, and we 
extend our sincere thanks to them. To our honored 
President, Judge Sloss, we are very grateful for his 



66 



uniform kindness, for personal favors, and for his ever- 
ready advice in everything that could add to the com- 
fort and well-being of the inmates of the Home. Our 
Honorary President, Mr. S. W. Levy, has hardly missed 
a Sunday during the year to visit the Home, and if he 
fails to appear on his usual visiting day and expected 
hour, we all feel his absence. We personally thank 
him and wish him many years of good health, that we 
and the inmates may have the benefit of his long experi- 
ence and patient ear. 

Our heartiest thanks are herewith extended to our 
noble Vice-President, Mr. A. Haas, and the chairmen 
of our House and Building Committees, Messrs. M. J. 
Brandenstein and Juda Newman, all of whom have 
given very liberally of their valuable time to the man- 
agement of the Home. Apart from their visits regu- 
larly every few days, their time, advice and influence 
are ever at our disposal. We fail in words to fittingly 
express our appreciation. Messrs. Goldstein and Worm- 
ser, also the remainder of the Directors, have called 
regularly and ably assisted us, for which we extend our 
thanks. 

We tender our sincere thanks to the Mt. Zion Hos- 
pital for the prompt and efficient attention given to 
those of our inmates who required hospital care; to the 
Ladies' Hebrew Sewing Society, for furnishing wear- 
ing apparel for our old ladies; to Miss Esther Martin 
and her friends, Mrs. Louis I. Simon, and the many 
other generous ladies, who supply amusement to our 
wards, and also to all those who have remembered the 
Home and its inmates in various ways; to our good 
physician, Dr. E. N. Torello, for his prompt response 
to the calls of the Home and efficient services; to Dr. 
Chas. G. Bush and Dr. M. R. Gambitz, for the dental 
work done for our old people. 



67 



With the beginning of this New Year, our and 
your tasks begin anew, ours to watch over the joys and 
sufferings of the aged and infirm, and yours to provide 
and assist, both of which are a pleasure. It is a mis- 
sion that appeals to the best impulses and dictates of 
the human heart and one that has its reward in the 
consciousness that rearing the orphan and caring for 
the aged is the noblest work of all. 

Very respectfully submitted, 
GUSTAVE and SARAH SCHNEE, 

Superintendent and Matron. 



lunatuma in Kind to % ^om* 



Mr. Sam Aftergut..l barrel Wine, 4 doz. Chickens, 7 Roosters, 

1 barrel Wine 

Crown Distilleries 1 case of Whisky 

Mrs. Simon Bachman. .Cakes, Candy, Cigars, $5.00 for Shoes, 
Marble Tablets in Synagogue, Gilding Altar in Synagogue, 

1 box Oranges, 1 box Cigars 

Mrs. J. Stern , 4 Shawls 

Mrs. Lengfeld 1 lot of Women's Clothing 

Mr. S. W. Heller 2 cases of Wine 

Mrs. Jacob C. Zellerbach 2 cases of Wine 

Mrs. M. Wunsch 2 Cases of Wine 

Mrs. E. L. Goldstein 1 gal. Whisky, 2 gals. Wine, Prayer 

Books, Handkerchiefs for all inmates, lot of Silverware, 
Dishes, Pictures, etc., Coffee Party and $5.00 for benefit of 

inmates 

Albert Otto Stein , l Cake 

Willard Bros Cigars and Playing Cards on 2 occasions 

Mrs. Bella S. Lilienthal Dinner in Honor of Wedding 

Mrs. W. S. Frank 5 Cakes 

Mrs. Rose Rosenblatt 3 cases of Wine on 3 occasions 

Mrs. William Wilson 2 doz. bottles Wine 

Mrs. Benjamin , 2 Cakes 

Mrs. Morris Schweitzer. 9 Twists 

Mrs. Charles Ackerman Coffee Cakes 

Mrs. David Gross $10 for benefit of inmates 

Temple Emanu-El Assorted Fruits 

Mrs. D. N. Walter 1 suit of Men's Clothing 

Menorah Club Entertainment 

Mrs. S. Koshland 5 boxes Mixed Cakes 

Ladies' Auxiliary P. H. O. A. & H. S..1 keg Wine for New 
Years, Birthday Party for an old inmate, Thanksgiving Din- 

ner, Purim Ball and Entertainment 

S. W. Levy Dinner for inmates in Honor of 82d Birthday 

Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Brandenstein. .In Honor of Silver Wedding, 
Dinner for inmates and 50 gals. White Wine, New Trousers 
for all men and New Waists for ladies, Cigars, Snuff, etc. 



69 

Mrs. Isaac N. Walter $50 for Screens to Windows 

Mrs. Joseph Haber 1 trunkful of Clothing 

Mrs. I. Levi Lot of Clothing 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Entertainment 

Mrs. S. L. Simon and Friends Several Entertainments 

Emporium $10 Worth of Merchandise 

S. L. Bernstein Ribbon Samples 

Mrs. Sidney L. Ehrman. .Art Glass Lamp for Altar in Synagogue 

Morris Meyerfeld, Jr.. Turkey Dinner for Christmas, $100 for 

Dinner and use in Synagogue in Honor of Silver Wedding 

Mrs. L. M. Cohn Pictures 

E. Bloch Mercantile Co 15 Ladies' Chatelaine 

Mrs. H. Wollenberg 1 Turkey 

Mrs. Bernhard Schweitzer. .3 Sweaters and a lot of Knitted Wear 

Quiros Soda Works 3 doz. Seltzer 

Mrs. Rosenblum Cakes, Cigars and Candy 

Mrs. William Haas 1 doz. Assorted Wine 

Morris Oppenheim Lot of Clothing 

Mrs. Chas. Keilus Lot of Hebrew Books 

Mr. Jos. Kahn Dinner in Honor of Daughter's Wedding 

I. W. Hellman $20 for benefit of inmates 

Mrs. Silverman Lot of Clothing 

Aaron Cahn 1 demij ohn of Whisky 

Mr. Adler Lot of Clothing 

Milton Essberg 1 box of Cigars 

Mrs. Sol Wangenheim 1 case of Wine 

Mrs. E. N. Helber Lot of Magazines 

Judah Newman 1 keg of White Wine 

Alexander Goldstein Men's Clothing 

Mrs. B. Asch Lot of Books 

Mrs. D. Cohan , Lot of Clothing 

Mrs. Godfrey Fisher 1 Rocker, 1 Lounge 

Mrs. Droffner , • Lot Clothing 

Mrs. Lowenthal Lot Clothing 

Mrs. Sachs and Mrs. Heller Lot of Boots 

Mrs. Phillip Anspacher Ice Cream and Cake Party 

Mrs. L. Stern, San Mateo Cut Flowers 

Mrs. Isaac N. Foorman, San Mateo 1 doz. Chickens 

Mrs. Lippman 1 trunkful of Clothing 

Mrs. Ben Anixter 8 Cakes 

M. Fleishman 1 box of Cigars 

Miss Anthony Cakes and Twists on several occasfons 



70 



Miss Esther Martin and Friends Several Entertainments 

Mrs. Fanny Wangenheim Fur Rug, Water Bottle, etc. 

Mrs. Calvin C. Eil * Coffee Cakes 

Louis Metzger Dinner in Honor of Wedding 

Mrs. M. J. Newmark * A lot of Men's Clothing 

Mrs. Morris Brown A lot of Men's Clothing 

Emanuel Lewis Tickets for Nickelodeon 

Mrs. Helena Weisenberg. .Twice $5.00 for Flowers and Services 

Mrs. Johana Levy Coffee and Cake Party 

Mrs. S. Hausman Lot of Clothing 

Mrs. Louise Wormser "Die Woche" during entire year 



PAST AND PRESENT 

OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES 

OF THE 
Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society 



tDECEASED 

t Anspacher, A 1883-1906 Trustee Hon.Trust.1906-1908 

Anspacher, Simon .. .1906-1909 Trustee 

tBerwin, P 1871-1877 Trustee 

tBloch, A 1871-1876 Trustee 

tBloch, I. F 1871-1883 Trustee 

tBrandenstein, Joseph. 1871-1909 Trustee Treasurer 1873 

Honorary Trustee 1909-1910 

Brandenstein, Max J..1909 Trustee In Office 

Cahn, David 1884-1887 Trustee 

tCerf, Jules 1871-1897 Trustee 

tCohn, Rev. Dr. Elkan. 1871-1875 Trustee 

tElfelt, Alfred P 1871-1886 Trustee. . .Sec. pro. tern 1871 

tEloesser, Leo ...Secy. 1872-1900 

Hon. Secy. 1900-1902 

Esberg, Alfred 1 1909 Trustee In Office 

tGerstle, Lewis 1874-1 yr.Trustee 

re-elected. .1880-1887 Trustee Treas. 1880-1887 

re-elected. .1890-1902 Trustee Treas. 1890-1902 

Goldstein, Alexander . .1911 Trustee In Office 

t Greenberg, H 1871-1873 Trustee 

tGreenebaum, Jacob. . .1871-1888 Trustee Secy. 1871-1872 

Greenebaum, Jacob 2 . 1873 Trustee In Office 

Treas. 1873-1879 

Greenebaum, Sig 1888-1909 Trustee. Vice-Pres. 1902-1908 

Hon. Trustee 1909 
Guggenhime, David J . 1910 Trustee In Office 



72 



Haas, Abraham 1902 Trustee In Office 

Vice-Pres. 1909 

tHelbing, August 1873 Trustee 

tHeller, Martin 1875-1894 Trustee 

Heller, Moses 1906 Trustee In Office 

Hellman, Isaias W...1902 Trustee In Office 

Treasurer 1902 

tKahn, Solomon 1909-1910 Trustee 

Levy, Meyer H Secy. 1901. In Office 

Levy, S. W 1871 Trustee In Office 

Vice-Pres. 1871-1873 

Pres. 1873-1908 

Hon. Pres. 1908 

tMeyer, Chas 1871-1877 Trustee . Vice-Pres. 1871-1872 

tMeyerstein, Lewis 1898-1906 Trustee 

tMorgenthau, Max 1871-1872 Trustee 

Michael, David Collector 1872-1911 

tNaphtaly, Joseph 1907-1910 Trustee 

Neustadter, J. H 1894-1906 Trustee 

Newman, Juda 1887 Trustee In Office 

Vice-Pres. 1908 

Pres. 1908-1909 

tRosenstock, S. W. .. .1886-1891 Trustee. Vice-Pres. 1896-1897 

re-elected . . 1894-1902 Trustee . Vice-Pres. 1900-1902 

Roth, Daniel 1897-1910 Trustee 

tSachs, Louis 1871-1890 Trustee Treas. 1871-1873 

Vice-Pres. 1883-1890 

Schwabacher, Sigmund 1911 Trustee In Office 

tSelig, Moses 1873-1881 Trustee 

Sheideman, B 1877-1909 Trustee . . . Hon. Trustee 1909 

tSimon, Herman L. .. .1872-1875 Trustee Pres. 1872-1873 

re-elected . . 1878-1885 Trustee Treas. 1887-1889 

re-elected . . 1887-1890 Trustee . Vice-Pres. 1894-1896 
re-elected . . 1891-1900 Trustee . Vice-Pres. 1891-1900 

Sloss, Max C, Judge. 1904 Trustee In Office 

Vice-Pres. 1908-1909 
Pres. 1909 

tSIoss, Louis 1876-1888 Trustee 

Solomons, Lucius L..1909 Trustee In Office 

tSteinhart, William 1871-1873 Trustee 

Stern, Jacob 1891 Trustee In Office 

tSweet, S 1871-1872 Trustee 

re-elected. . 1884-1878 Trustee 



n 




, 





73 



Weil, Mayer 1889-1894 Trustee 

Weill, Sylvain 1900-1903 Trustee 

tWertheimer, Emanuel.1871-1889 Trustee 

tWormser, Isaac 1871-1873 Trustee Pres. 1871-1872 

re-elected . . 1875-1894 Trustee . Vice-Pres. 1891-1894 

Wormser, Samuel I . . . 1894 Trustee In Office 



Sanations in Utaorg uxtb leqnwte 



Orphanage Home 

1871 Bequest of Simon A. Wormser $ 500.00 

1872 In memory of Lucien Lazard Aron 150.00 

1873 In memory of Caroline Sachs 150.00 

In memory of Sophie Schwabacher 50.00 

In memory of Sylvain Cahn 300.00 

1874 In memory of David Stern 1,000.00 

In memory of Mrs. Sara Brandenstein. . . 100.00 

In memory of Fannie Rosener 200.00 

In memory of Sol. Poley 10.00 

1875 In memory of Sigmund Gump 50.00 

In memory of Lazarus Hoffman 250.00 

In memory of Hyman Koppel 25.00 

In memory of Benjamin N. Lilienthal. . . 100.00 

1876 In memory of Joseph Greenebaum 100.00 

Bequest of S. Cohen 100.00 

1877 Bequest of Joseph H. Frank 500.00 

In memory of Mrs. Sam Wand & 3 chldrn 75.00 

1878 Bequest of John Chrisholm 50.00 

1879 Bequest of Jacob Lobenstein 500.00 

Bequest of S. B. Dinkelspiel 500.00 

Bequest of Michael Reese 20,000.00 

1880 Bequest of M. J. Isaacs 1,000.00 

In memory of Simon Greenewald 1,000.00 

1881 Bequest of Louis Strauss 10,000.00 

Bequest of Mrs. Wm. Scholle $ 800.00 

1882 In memory of Yvonne Cahn 100.00 

Bequest of Rev. Dr. Max Lilienthal 250.00 

Bequest of Albert Solomon 500.00 1,000.00 

Bequest of Frederick C. Wilke 1,000.00 

1883 Bequest of Herman Friedlander 500.00 



75 

Orphanage Home 

Bequest of Frederick C. Wilke (addit'n'l) 1,000.00 

In memory of Jonas Meyer 250.00 

1884 In memory of Joseph Rosenbaum 500.00 

Bequest of Moses Hirschfeld 7.00 

1884 Bequest of Louis Newfield 945.00 

In memory of Mrs. H. L. Simon 500.00 

Bequest of Monroe Ashbury 918.75 

Bequest of Fanny Sahlein 5,000.00 10,000.00 

1885 In memory of Olga Dora Coblentz 2.35 

In memory of William Sahlein 2,500.00 

Bequest of Abraham Seligman 500.00 

In memory of Mrs. Lehman 10.00 

Bequest of Senator Wm. Sharon 5,000.00 

1886 Bequest of Lesser Lezynsky 100.00 

Bequest of M. W. Fechheimer 700.00 

In memory of H. W. Stein 200.00 

1887 In memory of Mrs. Isadore Phillips 50.00 

Bequest of Chas. Kohler 500.00 

Bequest of Lazar M. Cahn 500.00 

In memory of Mrs. Julie Wolf 50.00 

1888 Bequest of Jones 100.00 

In memory of Jacob Greenebaum 1,000.00 

Bequest of M. Robitscheck 100.00 

Bequest of Louis Stiefel 500.00 

1889 In memory of Babette Heller 1,000.00 

Bequest of Benjamin Pulverman 250.00 

In memory of Jacob Haas 1,000.00 

Bequest of Emanuel Wertheimer 1,000.00 

In memory of Rev. Dr. Elkan Cohn.... 500.00 

1890 In memory of Rose Hyman 500.00 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of M. Phillips 250.00 

Bequest of Charles Abrams 25.00 

Bequest of Andrew Welch 5,000.00 

In memory of Babette Anspacher 1,000.00 

1890 In memory of Jette Schmuhl 50.00 

In memory of M. Phillips 250.00 

1891 In memory of Hilda Son 100.00 

Bequest of Louis Sachs 2,000.00 

In memory of Bertha Rosenbaum 1,000.00 



76 

Orphanage Home 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Eli Hochstadter 1,000.00 

In memory of Theo. N. Lilienthal 250.00 

Bequest of Mary J. O'Connor 5,000.00 

In memory of Johanna Levinsky 500.00 

In memory of Julius May 1,000.00 

In memory of Helen Berwin 500.00 

Bequest of Hyman W. Hyman 500.00 

Bequest of Herman Behrendt 5,200.00 

1892 Bequest of Maria R. Shannon 500.00 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

In memory of Henry H. Myers 500.00 

Bequest of Moses Rosenbaum 1,000.00 

In memory of Carrie Bachman 500.00 

Bequest of Eugene J. De Santa Marina.. 1,000.00 

Bequest of Joseph Rosenberg 10,000.00 

In memory of I. C. Moore 500.00 

In memory of E. L. Goldstein 1,000.00 

1893 Bequest of Moses Heller... 1,405.87 

In memory of Frederick L. Castle 500.00 

Bequest of James Phelan 5,000.00 

Bequest of Saul Mendelson 250.00 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Samuel Hort 500.00 

Bequest of Samuel Lachman 2,000.00 

In memory of David Sterns 100.00 

In memory of John Leo Lilienthal 250.00 

In memory of Fanny Rosenfeld 500.00 

In memory of Babette Levy 500.00 

1894 Bequest of Frank Livingston 1,000.00 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Max Morgenthau 100.00 

In memory of Babette Oppenheimer. .. . 100.00 

Bequest of Martial Hainque 100.00 

In memory of. Rose Goldstein Dinkelspiel 500.00 

Bequest of Martin Sachs 1,000.00 

1894 In memory of Leopold L Cahn 3,000.00 

Bequest of Martin Heller 1,000.00 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

In memory of Charlotte Boas 250.00 100.00 



77 

Orphanage Home 

In memory of Edgar S. Hochstadter 250.00 

In memory of Isaac Wormser 3,000.00 

Bequest of Regina Schloss 25.00 

1895 Bequest of Hiram A. Pearson 15,000.00 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Charles Lux 5,000.00 

Bequest of Isaac Dauss 250.00 100.00 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

Bequest of Morris Goldberg 1,821.60 

Bequest of James Carroll 2,375.00 

1896 In memory of Emile Levi 1,000.00 250.00 

Bequest of Isaac Hecht 1,428.75 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Caroline Maier 475.00 

Bequest of Bailey Gatzert 1,000.00 

Bequest of Louis Goldberg 70.22 

Bequest of Mendel Esberg 500.00 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

In memory of Isaac Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Hiram Pearson, 2d payment.. 2,305.56 

Bequest of Simon Koshland 1,000.00 

1897 Bequest of James Mervyn Donahue 3,967.73 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Gussie Greenebaum 1,000.00 

Bequest of Sig. L. Simon 500.00 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

In memory of Hannah Anspacher Myers 500.00 500.00 

Bequest of S. I. Simon 100.00 100.00 

Bequest of Sam L. Sachs 250.00 

Bequest of James Graham Fair 25,000.00 

Bequest of Philip Barth 250.00 

Bequest of Jacob Scholle 2,375.00 

1898 In memory of Julius L. Franklin 100.00 

Bequest of H. L. F. Morgan 150.00 

In memory of Abraham Fleishhacker . . . 100.00 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Leopold Rosenshine 500.00 

Bequest of Edward I. Cohn 1,000.00 

Bequest of Jose Vicente de Laveaga 5,065.68 

In memory of Fred Schwabacher 600.00 



78 

Orphanage Home 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

Bequest of Anton Riesner 500.00 

Bequest of Joseph Gordon 200.00 

Bequest of Abraham E. Hecht 500.00 500.00 

In memory of Julius Lowenstein 10.00 

Bequest of Pincus Berwin 500.00 

1899 In memory of Jacob Dusenbery 1,000.00 

Bequest of Charles Mayne 2,000.00 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

In memory of Manuel M. Heller 500.00 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

Bequest of Sarah Bloomingdale 500.00 

Bequest of Joseph May 2,000.00 

Bequest of Herman Liebes 250.00 

Bequest of Henry Hoffman 250.00 

Bequest of Moses Frank 563.15 

Bequest of Michael Schussler 100.00 

1900 In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Lillie Crocker 100.00 

In memory of David N. Walter 500.00 500.00 

Bequest of Louis Cahen 100.00 

Bequest of Hannah Sachs 1,000.00 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

Bequest of Herman L. Simon 3,000.00 

1901 Bequest of Louis Schwabacher 1,500.00 

Bequest of Myer Lewis 250.00 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

Bequest of Leopold Frankel 250.00 

In memory of Samuel Foorman 500.00 500.00 

Bequest of Adolph Bissinger 500.00 

Bequest of Israel Cahn ^ 1,000.00 

In memory of David Stern * 100.00 

Bequest of Lewis Brown 500.00 

Bequest of Marks Harris 100.00 

Bequest of Harris Cohn, Los Angeles... 50.00 

Bequest of Anna Schaffer, Seattle 200.00 

Bequest of Anna Cohn 5,000.00 

1902 Bequest of Leopold Brenner 500.00 

Bequest of Charles Sutro 1,000.00 



79 

Orphanage Home 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

In memory of Rachel Salz 500.00 500.00 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

Bequest of Isaac N. Jacoby 100.00 100.00 

Bequest of Samuel W. Rosenstock 10,000.00 

Bequest of Louis Sloss 10,000.00 

Bequest of George Aronson 100.00 

Bequest of Leopold Altschul 1,000.00 

Bequest of Lewis Gerstle 7,500.00 

1903 Bequest of Levi Strauss 20,000.00 10,000.00 

Bequest of James Finlayson, on account 2,000.00 

Bequest of H. L. F. Morgan 100.00 

In memory of Josephine Wormser 100.00 

In memory of Isaac Kaufman, Portland. 100.00 

Bequest of Hon. Sol. Hirsch, Portland. . 500.00 

Bequest of Louis Simon 1,000.00 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

In memory of John Rosenfeld 500.00 

Bequest of Miranda W. Lux 4,623.91 

Bequest of Rosa Levy 500.00 500.00 

Bequest of Jacob Hecht, Boston 1,000.00 

Bequest of Elias Jacobs, Visalia 4,750.00 

Bequest of Mrs. D. Harris, Sacramento.. 250.00 

1904 Bequest of Siegmund Rosenthal,Hamburg 4,744.96 

Bequest of Max Abraham 500.00 250.00 

Bequest of Caroline Pander 100.00 

Bequest of Clara Meyer 1,000.00 500.00 

Bequest of Samuel Sachs 1,000.00 

Bequest of Louis Wormser, New York.. 950.00 

In memory of Isidor Schwartz 750.00 500.00 

Bequest of Abraham Green 500.00 

In memory of David Stern 100.00 

Bequest of James Finlayson, 2d payment 1,711.59 

Bequest of Adam Grant 5,000.00 

In memory of Jane Brandenstein 1,000.00 

1905 Bequest of Charles F. Doe, 1st and 2d 

payments 3,600.00 

Bequest of Mrs. Isaac Hecht 1,000.00 

Bequest of Henry W. Hyman 1,000.00 

Bequest of George Goodman 500.00 



80 

Orphanage Home 

Bequest of James Tomkinson 500.00 

In memory of Phoebe Lowenthal 500.00 

Bequest of Amelia K. Hecht 250.00 

In memory of Amelia K. Hecht 250.00 

Bequest of Elizabeth Levy, Sacramento.. 200.00 

Bequest of Auguste Kullman 200.00 

Bequest of Solomon Borker, Berlin 100.95 

In memory of Wm. H. Bremer 100.00 

In memory of Adolph Boas 50.00 50.00 

Bequest of Pauline Jacobs 50.00 

Bequest of Charles F. Doe, 3d payment. 600.00 

Bequest of Charles Adler 250.00 

Bequest of Samuel Goldstein 1,000.00 

Bequest of David Marx 950.00 

Interest on Bequest of David Marx 369.00 

Bequest of Mrs. Lillie Scholle 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Bequest of William Alvord 1,000.00 

Bequest of Ralph Brown 500.00 

1906 Bequest of Henry Horstman 4,000.00 

Bequest of Charles Doe, 4th payment.... 700.00 

Bequest of Marie E. Hoover 250.00 

Bequest of Rosa Blum 100.00 

Bequest of Thomas D. Riordan 1,000.00 

Bequest of Emanuel Walter 5,700.00 

1907 Bequest of Adolph Kornblut 283.80 

In memory of Nettie Schwartz 750.00 500.00 

In memory of Harris Marks, Stockton.. 500.00 250.00 

In memory of Isaac Glazier, New York 1,000.00 

Bequest of Charles F. Doe, 5th payment 3,904.73 

Bequest of Bartlett Doe, 1st payment... 4,576.91 

In memory of Lewis Meyerstein 2,000.00 

Bequest of Abram Anspacher 500.00 500.00 

Bequest of Morris Bernhard Levy 1,500.00 

In memory of Mrs. A. W. Edelman, Los 

Angeles 20.00 20.00 

In memory of David Samuels 1,000.00 

Bequest of B. Tannenbaum 100.00 

Bequest of Julius Mendelson 200.00 

1908 In memory of Julius Platshek 1,000.00 

Bequest of Solomon Wasserman, Sacra- ; 

mento 500.00 . , ., ;; 



81 

Orphanage Home 

Bequest of Louis Levinsky 1,000.00 

Bequest of Katrine Van Reed 1,000.00 

Bequest of Rev. Abraham Wolf Edelman, 

Los Angeles 100.00 100.00 

Bequest of Charles F. Doe, 6th payment. 221.59 

Bequest of Bartlett Doe, 2d payment... 735.00 

In memory of parents of Leopold Jacob.. 20.00 20.00 

Bequest of Robert S. Farrelly 500.00 

Bequest of Bernard Triest 1,000.00 

In memory of Simon W. Glazier 2,500.00 

Bequest of Catherine Thomas 495.48 

1908 Bequest of Lavella Abraham 2,500.00 

Bequest of Rosa Vogelsdorff 500.00 

Bequest of Jacob Levi Sr 2,000.00 

In memory of Julia Meyer 1,500.00 

In memory of Matthias Meyer 1,000.00 500.00 

In memory of Walter Gundelfinger 100.00 

Bequest of Alfred Simon 1,000.00 

1909 Bequest of Bartlett Doe, 3d payment... 625.00 
Bequest of Rebecca G. Cohn, Marysville 100.00 

In memory of Babette Gatzert 1,000.00 

Bequest of Jeanne Roth Abrams 500.00 

In memory of Pauline Newman 500.00 

Bequest of Ephraim Simon 1,000.00 

Bequest of Charles F. Doe, 7th payment 428.35 

In memory of Clara Gerstle Mack 1,000.00 

Bequest of Rosine Cahn 1,000.00 500.00 

Bequest of Mary Kohl Pillsbury 2,500.00 

Bequest of Levi Shibling 5,000.00 

Bequest of Sophie Bowman 120.09 

Bequest of Bernard Schweitzer 1,000.00 

Bequest of Abraham Schwabacher 1,000.00 

Bequest of Albert Sutro 1,000.00 

1910 In memory of Michael S. Brennan 500.00 

Bequest of Bartlett Doe, 4th payment.. . 575.00 

Bequest of Julius Friedman 3,194.50 

Bequest of Simon Lewis Kline, Cor- 

vallis, Ore 500.00 

Bequest of Joseph Brandenstein 3,000.00 

In memory of Sarah Newmark, Los An- 
geles _ 250.00 

Bequest of A. Hamerslag 1,250.00 

In memory of Mrs. Herman Eppinger.. . 7.50 



Jmtattotts 

GLommzmavvdixiQ £&omt 3log0xts ^Ebrnt 



1892 
Mr. & Mrs. Alexander Weill, 
Commemorating Silver Wed- 
ding $1000.00 

1896 
Mr. & Mrs. Sylvain Weill, 
Commemorating - Silver Wed- 
ding $250.00 

1897 
Mr. & Mrs. Adolphe Roos, Com- 
memorating Silver Wedding 
$100.00 

1897 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Neustadter, 
Commemorating Silver Wed- 
ding $1000.00 

1897 

Lucien Godchaux, Commemorat- 
ing Parents Golden Wedding 

$20.00 

1897 
Mr. & Mrs. S. Foorman, Com- 
memorating marriage of Son, 
Isaac $1000.00 



Mr 



1897 
& Mrs. J. H. Neustadter, 



Commemorating Silver Wed- 
ding $500.00 



1898 
Mr. & Mrs. M. S. Grinbaurm 
Commemorating Silver Wed- 
ding $2000.00 

1899 
Mrs. Isaac Hecht, Commemor- 
ating daughter's Wedding 

$250.00 

1900 
Solomon Wangenheim, Com- 
memorating 70th Birthday 

$1000.00 

1901 
Mrs. L. Brenner, Commemor- 
ating 70th Birthday $50.00 

1901 

Miss Annie Simon, Commem- 
orating Marriage $100.00 

1903 

Mr. & Mrs. William Haas, Com- 
memorating Marriage ot 
Daughter Florine $500.00 



1904 
Mr. & Mrs. Louis W. Neustad- 
ter, Commemorating Marriage 
$100.00 

1904 
Mr. & Mrs. Jacob Stern, Com- 
memorating Silver Wedding 
$2000.00 

1905 
Mr. & Mrs. Herman W. New- 
bauer, Commemorating Mar- 
riage of Daughter $200.00 

1905 
Mr. & Mrs. Louis W. Neustad- 
ter, Commemorating First 
Wedding Anniversary $100.00 

1906 
Mr. & Mrs. Louis W. Neustad- 
ter, Commemorating Second 
Wedding Anniversary $100.00 

1907 
Mr. & Mrs. J. J. Mack, Com- 
memorating Marriage of 
Daughter $250.00 

1907 
Mr. & Mrs. Louis W. Newstad- 
ter, Commemorating Third 
Wedding Anniversary $100.00 

1908 
Miss Ruth V. Hyman, Com- 
memorating Wedding $100.00 

1908 
Mr. & Mrs. Louis W. Neustad- 
ter, Commemorating Fourth 
Wedding Anniversary $100.00 

1909 
Mr. & Mrs. Sig. Newman, Com- 
memorating Silver Wedding 
$100.00 

1909 
Mr. & Mrs. William Haas, 
Commemorating Marriage of 
Daughter $500.00 

1910 
Mr. & Mrs. Sol. Wangenheim, 
Commemorating Golden Wed- 
ding $1000.00 

1910 
Mr. & Mrs. Jacob Stern, Com- 
memorating Marriage of 
Daughter $50.00